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Three Roman Bloodlines

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Draconis View Post

    Ooh, drawing on the Secret Histories of Procopius I'm guessing? Now that's going to be exciting.
    The fun part of historical games is not in swapping trenchcoats for cloaks. It's in digging into the shadows of history and literature, the conspiracies that poke above water in the writings that survive, the contradictions that point to something erased or misrepresented, and then filling in those cracks with ... monsters, in a word.

    Justinian is just one example. I mean Theodora was apparently a ruthless former prostitute he picked up inexplicably. The Plague washed through Constantinople several times, and sickened them. They got "better." (While it killed the hell out of the city and rest of Europe--perhaps a hemorrhagic fever given that some surviving populations in Scandinavia hold genetic immunities to such aliments for no good reason.) Then later Procopius, who started out liking them alot, flips and writes some really horrible stuff on them right up VtR's ally.

    You go looking and this stuff writes itself. Just like the Bloodlines--they make sense. (See I'm not off topic, honest!)

    --Khanwulf

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Khanwulf View Post
      Justinian is just one example. I mean Theodora was apparently a ruthless former prostitute he picked up inexplicably. The Plague washed through Constantinople several times, and sickened them. They got "better." (While it killed the hell out of the city and rest of Europe--perhaps a hemorrhagic fever given that some surviving populations in Scandinavia hold genetic immunities to such aliments for no good reason.) Then later Procopius, who started out liking them alot, flips and writes some really horrible stuff on them right up VtR's ally.
      Indeed! I mean, Procopius explicitly says Justinian and Theodora weren't human: he claims they were actually brotoloigô, which some translators render as "vampires", others as "succubi". As far as I can tell, it's an old epithet for some of the pre-Christian gods, which Procopius equated with demons. So if you wanted a word for "seductive demons posing as false gods", there's the Avestan word Daēva

      And that's just going off of a single line in book 12. Ancient historians might not always be the most impartial, but their works make for some amazing stories.

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      • #18
        Byzantium lasted longer than the Camarilla. We really need a proper DE for it. Something more than its fall to the Turks and how the Demons felt about that. If the Arabian Nights DE can span a millennia then so can Second Rome.

        And this just illustrates how much more awesome VtR is than VtM: in the latter, Constantinople was founded and ruled by a trio of really old, ossified vamps who eventually had a falling-out over, well, going mad basically.

        And one of them was disturbingly pretty.

        Boring stuff. (Not the pretty part, tho.)

        --Khanwulf

        PS Edit: Historians even today, pretending to be objective and all that, do NOT put the effort into compiling records and narrating history without applying a biased objective to it. Back in the day? When ink and "paper" was expensive? You didn't write without a careful purpose to it.

        That's why conflicting accounts are so cool in alt-history: you don't have to pick which you like, but find a way to make both true(ish), from a certain point of view....
        Last edited by Khanwulf; 02-20-2019, 02:58 PM.

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