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What are "boons" from?

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  • James_Nostack
    started a topic What are "boons" from?

    What are "boons" from?

    On the VTR forums I've seen references to "boons" several times. It doesn't appear in a quick search of VTR 1e or 2e core books, so I'm wondering what it's from, and why they matter.

  • Jack
    replied
    You could possibly draw influence from the John Wick movies and their "boons" being in the form of gold coins.

    reference: https://john-wick.fandom.com/wiki/Gold_Coin

    Leave a comment:


  • Leandro16
    replied
    What i did with blood contract is to make it work like a blood bond but to certain kind of action for example:

    Prince Maxwell from chicago signs a blood contract with the Gangrel Primogen that gives her right to a domain in the docks as long as she doesnt claim more domain for the next 200 years

    If one of them were to break their promises then he will have to pay 1 WP to act against the contract for a scene and in case of succed make a degneration check.No matter what happens if the contract is broken the one who does gets to bear the mark of the Oathbreaker TM suffering 3 levels of agg damage putting them in disavantadge should the other part choose to take actions

    Leave a comment:


  • tsusasi
    replied
    Originally posted by Shawarbaaz View Post

    So it's no longer a thing as of Requiem 2e?
    Unless you count Invictus Oaths as boons because they're ritualized promises, there's nothing for it in 2nd edition. I don't count them as boons because the mechanics reward one party or the other for breaking their oath to fuck over the other side, which is antithetical to the concept of employing a system to ensure someone keeps their word.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawarbaaz
    replied
    Originally posted by Rose Bailey View Post
    Boons were a ritualized form of owed favors in Masquerade. They tied into the Prince/sheriff/harpies city style.
    So it's no longer a thing as of Requiem 2e?

    Leave a comment:


  • Draconis
    replied
    Basically what the others have said.

    For old enough vampires, time stops having much meaning, and it doesn't take long to have enough money to live comfortably. So the more useful form of currency is favors from other vampires.

    In some (especially Invictus but others too) cities, these get ritualized to make it harder for people to ignore their debts. Trust is hard to come by in a city full of predators, so if people find out they can't trust your word, you'll start losing allies quickly.

    A "boon" generally refers to a ritualized favor like this. If someone says they owe you a boon, it means they're staking their reputation on being able and willing to pay back the favor whenever you need it. Much more reliable than "I owe you one".

    --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---

    OOC, the concept came from Masquerade, was carried through without much comment in Requiem 1e, and a lot of people still use it in Requiem 2e. I think the Invictus book has examples of how particular cities enforce them, because the Invictus stereotypically care about these sorts of formal systems more than anyone else. But how much any individual city—or any individual vampire—cares, that's up to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Live Bait
    replied
    The term also came up in the first edition Invictus book. Maybe other places.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rose Bailey
    replied
    Boons were a ritualized form of owed favors in Masquerade. They tied into the Prince/sheriff/harpies city style.

    Leave a comment:


  • Live Bait
    replied
    It means a favour. Normally calling one in or promising one.

    Leave a comment:

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