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  • #16
    Originally posted by LostLight View Post
    While this book is really full of good stuff (just keep that parasite awaty from me, please), my two favorites are the Nowhere Men and the Noctuku Strain. I really like the Noctuku in this form (I prefer it over the original bloodline format, actually), and I kinda like to think about it as the Nosferatu's version of Malkavia (even though that throwing it together witht he Contagion also works, but that also works for Malkavia, so...). That kinda makes me think about what could be the other parallels for the rest of the Clans- even though that doing it simply for symmetry's sake could downgrade the mystery behind it a bit. As for the Nowhere Men, they really give the feeling of Discipline Mysticism and the feeling of "living Disciplines"- either meaning that Obfuscate connects to something other (which have implications for the origin of the Disciplines and how they work- as if Obfuscate is "the Place Beyond the Fire", and the strix are basically smoke and shadows, and then you do 2 + 2 and get that maybe by cloaking them with Obfuscate the vampires remove themselves to the so called Dis- which ties those things to the strix and I could go on and on with those implications), or that Obfuscate is alive, and the Nowhere Men are its incarnations which are very, very hungry- and that maybe other Disciplines also have other incarnations (which once agains goes to tying them to the strix because vampires and embodied entities and such).

    Inn short, it is all very cool. I'll leave a review once the site would let me do so.

    Concerning the other Clans, I can't help but think that the Gangrel's depravations would not come from an over-abundance of the Beast but rather its sleepiness. What would take it place as it slumber but the Gangrel has to feed and deal with his mutable undead body without the reassuring presence of his Beast? To which depth would he fall simply to reawaken it ? That could be interesting to explore I think.

    Also, this book seems awesome ! I don't have much money right now but when i'll have, I think I'll add it to my collection !
    Last edited by Ur-Than; 01-12-2021, 12:14 PM.

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    • #17
      I will say this book (and its sibling Strange Shade) was great! Its been a while since I devoured a source book as quickly and made me want to read me more while sparking tons of "Oh wow that's cool what if-" moments.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Bloodyquill View Post
        I will say this book (and its sibling Strange Shade) was great! Its been a while since I devoured a source book as quickly and made me want to read me more while sparking tons of "Oh wow that's cool what if-" moments.
        Wait till you see the next one!


        Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

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        • #19
          Oh wow, already? Nice. Cannot wait to get my hands on this! In particular, I'm very interested in what this team has done with necropoli, since I find the 1e mechanics really... I just don't like them. So I'm looking forward to what everyone here has done, especially since my previous attempts to hack necropoli haven't really satisfied me. |D


          Consistently Inconsistent
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          • #20
            Originally posted by SomethingFishy View Post
            Oh wow, already? Nice. Cannot wait to get my hands on this! In particular, I'm very interested in what this team has done with necropoli, since I find the 1e mechanics really... I just don't like them. So I'm looking forward to what everyone here has done, especially since my previous attempts to hack necropoli haven't really satisfied me. |D
            Interestingly enough, we took some inspiration from the mechanics for lodges in Werewolf. Obviously, Necropoli don't have totems or sacred hunts, but we were able to take the bare bones of that system and turn it into something creepy and thematic (with a few twists). Warrens are more oriented for all-Haunt chronicles, but the material there has lots of things you could use in a regular chronicle. And the sample Necropoli are some of my favorite things in the book.

            Speaking of Necropoli, that brings us to today's preview: The Lygos.

            The Lygos are the other bloodline from The Beast That Haunts the Blood, and, honestly, they're the less interesting of the pair, in my opinion. They're kind of a retread of the Baddacelli from Bloodlines: The Chosen, without any cool sound powers. So, while you'll certainly recognize them, they've gotten a little stranger over the years...

            Lygos: The Ones Who Snuff Out Your Light

            "Don't be silly. Of course you should be afraid of the dark."

            Children fear the dark. In some, this phobia is fleeting, easily dismissed with a moment’s thought. In others, it lingers for years, requiring constant reassurance and parental comfort. Yet when these children grow up, they’re expected to just get over it. Put away the night-light; pull the blanket down. Most people manage to rationalize away their juvenile fears, but some never do, panicking in unlit rooms well into adulthood.

            Why is that? Why do some people never get over an irrational fear of the dark?

            Maybe because they know it’s not irrational. On a primal level, they know that the things they hid from in childish terror weren’t imaginary. That they’re real. That they have a name.

            The Lygos are an ancient line, dating back to before true cities sprouted over the world’s surface. They dwelled in places the sun never touched, dragging victims down where none could hear their screams. When other, lesser Nosferatu rose to the surface to scratch out a meager existence in the light, the Lygos remained below, as all Kindred should. They learned to listen to the dark, to hear its secrets, and let it guide them to beings that had never known the light, more wonderful and terrible than any vampire. The Lygos came to serve them, these Dwellers Below, and in exchange they gifted the Truths of Erebus upon them, so they might better cleave to their masters.

            Rumors cling to the Lygos like wet earth. An Acolyte from Bucharest says they devour light like other Kindred consume blood. A Dragon in Istanbul claims they have no hearts, just chunks of obsidian embedded beneath their ribs. However, no matter how strange the rumor, all stories of the Lygos have a commonality: They hate the light. Lygos have been caught sabotaging streetlights, snuffing candles, shattering flashlights, and otherwise destroying any light-source they can get their hands on, even inactive ones. These Kindred don’t just inhabit and encourage the dark — they worship it. Other vampires often hear them uttering prayers as they knock over lampposts or smash lightbulbs, as if birthing shadow were a holy act.

            Due to this obsession, most Lygos live underground. Not content with boarded windows and blackout curtains, a Creep won’t sleep soundly without a few feet of dirt between her and the sun. It takes extreme circumstances for a Shade to accept a haven above ground, and if nothing suitable is available, she’ll make her own, burrowing deep beneath the earth with her own two hands. The Lygos are proficient Necropoli builders, and almost never emerge from their tunnels except to feed, or to carry out their bizarre work.

            The Shades are content to let the Kindred whisper; what the All Night Society thinks has never mattered to them. The Lygos know the truth, after all. If they extinguish enough light, and spread the righteous fear of the dark, their masters will rise from the deepest places in the earth, covering the world in blissful blackness. They do this not just for themselves, but for the sake of all vampires. One night soon, they’ll thank the Lygos. The Shades know the world began in darkness, and in the end, that’s all that will be left.

            Why you want to be us

            You exist in a world of perpetual night, so why not command the darkness? You find the dark comforting and know it’s where you really belong. You’re tired of those in the world above calling your appearance offensive, or your actions strange. Here in the void, no one can judge you.

            Why you should fear us

            Other Kindred cling to the edges of light, but only we make the darkness our skin. There is nowhere you can run from us, because night is our ally. There is nowhere you can hide from us, because we are the shadows where you seek shelter. There is nowhere you can escape from us, because light is just an imposition. Darkness is the natural state.

            Why we should fear ourselves

            Ours is a losing war. Every day the kine fill the world with more light, soiling the purity of darkness. Few places are truly dark, yet our masters compel us to make more. We fear disappointing them — even more than the light, and our zeal blinds us in ways it never could.

            The Truths of Erebus (Excerpt)

            The Dwellers Below taught the Shades much, and the bloodline’s elders have codified and spread these lessons so all Lygos might benefit from their wisdom. These are the Truths of Erebus. Similar to a Coil of the Dragon, the Truths bring about personal transformation, but rather than overcoming the Kindred Curse, the Truths adapt the Lygos to a Requiem in the deep darkness, making them more akin to the things they serve.

            The Lidless Eye •

            If everything is darkness, then nothing is, and “nothing” provides no barrier to sight. The vampire can see perfectly in total darkness, ignoring all situational penalties and Tilts like Blinded. Nothing can obscure her sight — not even the destruction of her eyes. Furthermore, she becomes attuned to the low places of the world, adding her Truths dots to Blood Potency for the purposes of Kindred Senses when moving through darkness.







            Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

            Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
            Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
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            • #21
              Originally posted by Yossarian View Post

              Interestingly enough, we took some inspiration from the mechanics for lodges in Werewolf. Obviously, Necropoli don't have totems or sacred hunts, but we were able to take the bare bones of that system and turn it into something creepy and thematic (with a few twists). Warrens are more oriented for all-Haunt chronicles, but the material there has lots of things you could use in a regular chronicle. And the sample Necropoli are some of my favorite things in the book.
              That makes a lot of sense, tbh. The Lodge Merits are basically a more streamlined version of the shared Merit pool used to construct necropoli in 1e, so giving those Merits a Lodgey makeover is really obvious in retrospect!


              Consistently Inconsistent
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              • #22
                Originally posted by SomethingFishy View Post

                That makes a lot of sense, tbh. The Lodge Merits are basically a more streamlined version of the shared Merit pool used to construct necropoli in 1e, so giving those Merits a Lodgey makeover is really obvious in retrospect!
                That may in fact have been what went through my mind. “Oh, these are like lodge Merits!”



                Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

                Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
                Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Yossarian View Post

                  That may in fact have been what went through my mind. “Oh, these are like lodge Merits!”
                  Actually, that also nicely addresses one of my biggest complaints about the 1e system. There isn't a complex system of individual Merits providing semi-universal benefits to everyone, or rather there is, but it is fake, and you don't lose access to the library if Sneaky Pete meets the sun, or whatever. You also have to opt-in on the effects you want, rather than buying an entrance fee Merit so you can use the goodies of some NPC that you were really after.

                  I like this a lot. Even more excited to get my hands on it, now!


                  Consistently Inconsistent
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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by SomethingFishy View Post

                    Actually, that also nicely addresses one of my biggest complaints about the 1e system. There isn't a complex system of individual Merits providing semi-universal benefits to everyone, or rather there is, but it is fake, and you don't lose access to the library if Sneaky Pete meets the sun, or whatever. You also have to opt-in on the effects you want, rather than buying an entrance fee Merit so you can use the goodies of some NPC that you were really after.

                    I like this a lot. Even more excited to get my hands on it, now!
                    Yeah, the original mechanics struck me as trying to do a lot with a little. It's a neat idea, but we felt it needed a more robust system. That being said, we tried to make sure the Merits we included could be used in regular play without the entire Necropolis system. You could even use Clots (the hazardous environmental "quirks" that pop up in Warrens) without any of the other stuff.

                    But yes, I hope you enjoy it!

                    Anyway, here's our next preview.

                    unLike some of the other updated bloodlines, our Yagnatia aren't too different in outlook or aesthetics, but of the four older bloodlines, they're the ones who've changed the most mechanically. I liked their old bane, but while the idea of the infertile bite has some interesting story hooks to it, I wanted that to be a family custom rather than an inherent thing. Conclusion being, it felt a bit too passive for a bane in Second Edition, though their original weakness is included as an optional system, and we present an option so both versions could exist in your chronicle. I also felt that, unlike other Haunts, the Yagnatia wouldn't have much interest in skulking through the shadows, so their Disciplines have been tweaked as well. Now they favor Resilience over Obfuscate. I just really love Haunts with Resilience and Vigor. It wasn't an arbitrary decision, of course, but you'll have to read their entry to see why.

                    Yagnatia: The Ones Who Rule You

                    "My crown is my blood, and my blood is the birthright of my gods."


                    He carries himself in the manner of one born with a silver spoon in his mouth, but the too-wide grin suggests a dagger. The blood beneath his fingernails is fresh with the scent of copper, yet he still expects you to wipe your boots before you step into his parlor. Mind the carpet! It hasn’t been fed. When he invites you to stay for dinner, you’re not sure whether to be frightened or flattered. A little of both eases digestion, they say, but answer quick lest your host be offended. Answer quick or you’ll be the silverware.

                    The Yagnatia defy their clan’s lot in the Danse Macabre. Most Haunts are self-loathing serfs who fear their own faces, and wouldn’t know power if it staked them through a throne. But to a Boyar, horror is divine right. Wearing her clan’s curse on a velvet sleeve just means she’s more fit to rule.

                    This regal terror isn’t just temporal power. It’s spiritual. Witch-Kings and Sorcerer-Queens, the old gods of Russia blessed the Yagnatia as they rose to rule the Dark Ages, and so they reign their fiefs with a wormwood wand, not a scepter. Before the Circle of Crone spread like a parasite across the Old World, the Boyars knew the secrets of Crúac, holding the night against Westerners set on tearing down pagan ways. The Lancea et Sanctum and Clan Ventrue — pretenders to imperial legacies they themselves destroyed — were the bloodline’s undying foes in a war for the Russian nightlife, and the Yagnatia still bear those grudges with a bitter glee.

                    The Boyar will to power takes many forms. They lair in both fortified manses and high-security skyscrapers, content to shepherd their vassals away from corruption and quaint ideas like democracy. Some are warlords cum wizards, commanding dead armies fat on the ichor of dark gods, while others play the stock market with spiritual insider trading. However they choose to spend their Requiems, the Yagnatia value a strict caste system above all else. Those born above remain above, and those below should remember their manners.

                    Yet, for all their fealty to tradition, the Yagnatia have few holdings left in the Motherland. As the centuries wore on, the Sanctified won the souls of Russian Kindred, and the Ventrue won their minds, but the death blow came when the Bolsheviks seized power. In a frenzy of Embraces, the bloodline’s enemies commanded their fledglings to topple “tsarist” Yagnatia domains, sweeping away their wealth, their faith, and their death grip on feudalism. Following the civil war, the Boyars scattered. Some remained in their ancestral land, but more than half fled to Western Europe and East Asia. Many feared this would break the bloodline’s link to the land, but the Yagnatia are nothing if not adaptable. Most found new spirits in new environs, and new gods to legitimize their rule.

                    The Boyars keep their numbers small. Only those of noble heritage may join the bloodline, though in recent years they’ve begun to welcome more non-Slavs. However, a Yagnatia never Embraces without permission from her titled elders, and this practice has led to rumors of impotent Vitae — rumors the Yagnatia themselves spread among their rivals, spinning tales of witches and an infertile bite.

                    Better the Kindred believe they could never rise again.

                    Why you want to be us

                    Would you rather be a tunnel grub or command men with an awful glance? We chose the latter, and thus we became the chosen in turn. We are beloved of the gods, and so they allowed us to remake them to better fit our needs. You need only look upon our faces to see their blessings. Few are worthy of our Vitae, but those who are become more than sniveling Haunts.

                    Why you should fear us

                    Humans have such limited philosophies. This is true of the lower classes as well (both living and dead), but humans… humans cling to the silly belief that they’re owed something for being alive. That they deserve life. The gods are not so generous. We teach the low that life must be earned, and remind the high that the gods can always choose to take it away — and that we are the instrument of that choice.

                    Why we should fear ourselves

                    We could be wrong. Maybe we’re just like all the other rats, but managed to upholster our garbage. What happens when everyone else realizes it? What happens when the spirits we command by the grace of our gods see it’s all a pretense, and that we’re just blood-sacks playing at nobility with forces we don’t really understand?

                    Parent Clan: Nosferatu

                    Nicknames: Boyars, Vozhds, Pretenders (post-1917; disrespectful)

                    Bloodline Bane (The Curse of Bielobog): The Boyars honor the gods of the land, and they must answer for all disrespect. A Yagnatia’s Humanity caps any dice pools or traits used to resist the Numina of ephemeral beings. This also applies to Strix Dread Powers and Embodiments.

                    Disciplines: Dominate, Nightmare, Resilience, Vigor
                    Last edited by Yossarian; 01-13-2021, 10:45 PM.



                    Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

                    Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
                    Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
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                    • #25
                      I got it. And I love it - it really nails how Nosferatu are both the most inhuman and most humane Clan; the monster is obvious, but that's because it's most distinct from the Man in Haunts. They know exactly what the source of their problems are, and they revel in and curse it in equal measure. A Nosferatu's most lethal secret is shown for the world to see - they don't have as much to hide, so often, you can trust them more - if they trust you first.

                      Also, you really showed your creativity with the three Antagonists; Fear Eaters are rather admirable in their own way, even if they are a cult, Noctuku are some of the most creative takes on fear of zombies I've seen (they can infect Haunts, but the real risk is that they don't become brainless - they're hunters), and the Nowhere Men are incredible set dressing with an undertone of cosmic horror (after all - you can't kill them, you just see them long enough for them to make off with a hand).


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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Leliel View Post
                        I got it. And I love it - it really nails how Nosferatu are both the most inhuman and most humane Clan; the monster is obvious, but that's because it's most distinct from the Man in Haunts. They know exactly what the source of their problems are, and they revel in and curse it in equal measure. A Nosferatu's most lethal secret is shown for the world to see - they don't have as much to hide, so often, you can trust them more - if they trust you first.

                        Also, you really showed your creativity with the three Antagonists; Fear Eaters are rather admirable in their own way, even if they are a cult, Noctuku are some of the most creative takes on fear of zombies I've seen (they can infect Haunts, but the real risk is that they don't become brainless - they're hunters), and the Nowhere Men are incredible set dressing with an undertone of cosmic horror (after all - you can't kill them, you just see them long enough for them to make off with a hand).
                        Thank you so much! That duality was a theme I wanted to hit hard in this one. The dirty cycle of being a Nosferatu is such a fun concept to play with, and I think all the writers nailed it.

                        And I'll pass on your praise about the antagonists to their author. He spilled a lot of ink over them, and I think they worked out wonderfully. I'm especially fond of the Fear Eaters, because they're not the kind of antagonist you see much in Vampire.



                        Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

                        Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
                        Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
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                        • #27
                          Excellent work, just like with the last one!
                          Just a question about authorial intent here. Most of the larger Bloodline Discipline adjustments make sense, like the Gethsemani trading in Vigor for Resilience or Yagnatia losing Obfuscate for Resilience, but I am not so clear on the logic of why the Keepers of the Dark also trade Vigor for Resilience. Any input you can give me here?


                          Politeness is the lubricant of social intercourse.

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                          • #28
                            ChoD: Chcago still exists? I was surethis setting is first edition exclusively.
                            Last edited by Lashet; 01-14-2021, 02:04 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Lashet View Post
                              ChoD: Chcago still exists? I was surethis setting is first edition exclusively.
                              We have not had much on Chicago in 2e, but we have had at least one new story about Maxwell and Birch in the Strix Chronicle Anthology, which also delves into the mystery of Old John. However, I do not remember any Chicago perspectives from the Idigam Chronicle and Fallen World Chronicle Anthologies.
                              Last edited by saibot; 01-14-2021, 03:04 PM.


                              Politeness is the lubricant of social intercourse.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by saibot View Post
                                Excellent work, just like with the last one!
                                Just a question about authorial intent here. Most of the larger Bloodline Discipline adjustments make sense, like the Gethsemani trading in Vigor for Resilience or Yagnatia losing Obfuscate for Resilience, but I am not so clear on the logic of why the Keepers of the Dark also trade Vigor for Resilience. Any input you can give me here?
                                Glad you enjoy it!

                                The Keepers are all about defense and opposition, less about fighting their enemies directly. They just make sure to survive long enough to bring the other guy down. They’re also (not so secretly) the Lygos’ eternal foes, and it makes sense for them to have opposing physical Disciplines.



                                Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

                                Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
                                Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
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