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  • #61
    Originally posted by 21C Hermit View Post

    “Signature Subsystem” ? Can’t go wrong with alliterative names.
    I might just steal that...



    Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

    Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
    Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
    Storytellers Vault: Author Page

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by Yossarian View Post

      I might just steal that...
      It’s not stealing if it’s up for free!


      MtAw Homebrew:
      Even more Legacies, updated to 2E
      New 2E Legacies, expanded

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by SomethingFishy View Post
        When I was going over the book with my group, we definitely spent a moment wondering how the Daimonion's capabilities would interact with draugr [and Passengers, for that matter]. We eventually concluded that those sorts of interactions would be such enormous edge cases that we figured it was a "what works best for the table/story" situation, but it is very interesting to hear that they were originally envisioned as attuned to draugr...

        Also, the Risen Beast is definitely my group's favorite thing from the book, so I'm excited to hear more about its development!

        For what my perspective is worth, here is my input.

        Draugrs: As you can see by the mention of the draugr-hunting sheriff in the intro and also another reference in the Rumor section, draugr are meant to be open books to the Daimonion. Mechanically, Beast Whisperers should always benefit from the additional Auspex question and [REDACTED] when targeting draugr. Whether Therian Psychoanalysis should apply is a lot murkier, especially because of the specific mechanics referenced. Technically, as per 1e's Night Horrors: Wicked Dead, draugr are not in a state of "permanent frenzy" or somesuch, so you would expect that they could still be calmed down to some degree. I would consider a spin-off Merit for variants directly related to handling draugrs. Could this include an effect that gives a chance to pull back a draugr to Humanity 1? Maybe.

        Passengers: You could spin it in two entirely different directions that could both make sense.
        1. The one is that reading a Kindred with Passenger is actually easier as the Passenger communicates their desires much more easily understandable. This could even include Daimonion being able to directly converse with the Passenger (perhaps based on a Merit or Devotion) on some level for much more clear information. The Passenger, in turn, should have some means of proactively taking advantage of the bloodline's Bane to recruit accomplices. Such contact should leave the Counselor more likely to develop a Passenger of her own.
        2. The Passenger confuses matters. Imagine someone being forced into therapy or only going half-heartedly. Such patients may have a part in themselves that actively sabotages any chance of progress. In Kindred, that's the Passenger. The Passenger is jealous and would not give up its unique position of trust it has with its host to an outsider. The Counselor may still be able to tell that a Passenger is present quite quickly by the resistance they face. In that case their gift may simply not work at all or be turned against them with intentional misinformation (always a fun game, figuring out when the habitual liar is telling the truth). Those Daimonion that lean harder into the therapist angle may actually consider suppressing the Passenger a duty to aid the "host" in improving their Requiem.
        Of course, both could be true based on the individual involved!


        And bonus: Society of the Accord
        As Yossarian has already implied, making special mechanics for members of a single bloodline in a minor covenant is generally a bridge too far, but the Daimonion and Society are an obvious fit. I would encourage Players and Storytellers to work in at least some specific (Merit-based?) advantages for Counselors in the Society. I would also like to point to the Curse of Attunement for having interesting implications for Dialogs and very unique negotiations.


        Politeness is the lubricant of social intercourse.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by saibot View Post
          Maybe one interesting little info with the Daimonion is that "vampire psychotherapist/analysist" was not the idea right from the start. I originally wanted to do a bloodline that has some special attunement and understanding for draugrs, but during the initial brainstorming it quickly became clear that it was too niché of a concept, so I broadened that to a more general "Beast whisperer" archetype, which then quickly turned into what we have now.
          I'm not even a fan of Requiem's focus on bloodlines - at all - but here you've taken the core idea of the Therion bloodline from 1st Edition's book on Belial's Brood (counselors who work dark magic to keep frenzy-prone vampires lucid and functional) and turned it into something better developed, free of the juvenile sacrilege baggage, and acceptable in "polite" vampiric society, and it's too damn clever for me to fail to commend you. That's a really impressive bloodline design.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Reasor View Post

            I'm not even a fan of Requiem's focus on bloodlines - at all - but here you've taken the core idea of the Therion bloodline from 1st Edition's book on Belial's Brood (counselors who work dark magic to keep frenzy-prone vampires lucid and functional) and turned it into something better developed, free of the juvenile sacrilege baggage, and acceptable in "polite" vampiric society, and it's too damn clever for me to fail to commend you. That's a really impressive bloodline design.
            I don't want to derail the thread, but I would like to give you a suggestion since you say you don't like bloodlines. Of course that makes a decent chunk of Requiem material useless to you, but you can still get a lot of mileage out of bloodlines by transforming them from whole families into individual weird elders. Enrich the strangeness of your setting and use all the mechanics that they offer, without making it seem to the players that being one of these weirdos is normal, common or expected. On the side of Merits and Devotions, often enough, just minor fiddling makes them appropriate to other Kindred. This would be doubly true in a setting without bloodlines where you don't have to keep them exclusive to one line for the MY TREASURE factor.

            And thank you very much for the compliment!


            Politeness is the lubricant of social intercourse.

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            • #66
              Alrighty, let's get into some of the antagonists/allies: First up, the Brides of Dracula.

              I actually don't have much to comment on here, apart from the Brides are awesome and I'm really pleased how our 2E version turned out. They're not too different from their original incarnation, but now they have significantly more mechanical weight, and the doomsday prepper aspect gives them a little more focus (though it's a detail you can emphasize to any degree you see fit). We also couldn't resist the chance to update Count F***ing Dracula's stats. The Count also hasn't changed much, though he's learned a couple new tricks over the years.

              We also couldn't resist getting a quick update of the Bruja in there, since they feature quite a bit in the Brides' backstory. Plus one of the other authors thought up the perfect tagline for them, so we pretty much had to include them by law.

              Tomorrow, let's continue with our other covenant: The Society of the Accord

              The Brides of Dracula: The Vanguard

              "Fuck you."

              You want to join the Brides of Dracula because

              You know might makes right. You were a biker or rally racer in life and want to keep burning rubber in death. You’d rather learn things on your own terms than have someone tell you. You’re not interested in hiding from your prey. You believe in individualism but you’re still desperate for a family.

              The big picture

              Vampires, superior to the mortal flock they’re sired from, are predators at heart. There’s no religious or spiritual significance to a sentiment like that: It’s a statement of fact. Kindred are strong, so they hunt humans. They take what they want from the kine and move on. How insignificant is a mortal compared to a lone Lick, even aside from the powers granted by the Blood? Why bother hiding from the herd at all? Sure, it’s good not to leave any witnesses, but that also means icing every motherfucker you even think saw you gnawing on some punk and then leaving them all rotting in a ditch. Some predators hunt in the shadows their whole existence, stepping into the light only when they’re sure they’ll never, ever be caught.

              The Brides of Dracula call these vampires “bitches.”

              Part gang, part cult, part Mongol horde, the Brides are the All Night Society’s only officially chartered motorcycle club. More than that, they’re an army, but they don’t fight at anyone’s behest. Their founder takes a hands-off approach to his band of wild monsters. Nor do the Brides fight for any ideals, or some vague political endpoint. Laws, decency, and even the Traditions are, at best, “guidelines,” or, at worst, contrary to the pursuit of whatever the hell a Fury wants. The strong rise above the weak, and the weak test themselves until they’re strong or dead. Or both.

              Why the obsession with personal strength? Ask the Count. Count Dracula, son of the Impaler. Count Fucking Dracula, the meanest, toughest son of a bitch in the Danse Macabre. See, the Count has done his work. He’s read the tea leaves and applied his book learning, looked into the future and found it wanting. One night soon, Kindred won’t be able to deny what they are to the world, and that’s a world that’ll hunt down every last bloodsucker under the gleaming eye of the sun. For the vast volume of secrets and lies that keep the All Night Society safe, they’re still fragile things, and in an age of social media, smartphones, and increasingly deadly weapons, a time will come when there’s no more hiding. Humans already know vampires are real, but once they figure out how to pick them out of a crowd, it’ll be apocalyptic, and the Brides are the Count’s Vanguard against the coming storm.

              The Furies thrive in a culture of war against everyone and everything. Sooner or later, something’s going to cast a painful light upon the Kindred, and they aren’t going to be caught unawares. Some chapters are doomsday preppers, building secret fortresses where they’ll party as the walls tumble down. Others are quasi-religious, always moving judgment day down the calendar whenever a prophecy doesn’t deliver. Armageddon is always looming, but no one wearing a cut really gives a fuck what form it takes. The Brides will survive the end and march into the uncertainty of eternity. Till then, and even after, they’re going to ride like there’s no tomorrow.

              Where we came from

              Every Bride worth her colors knows it all starts with one man: Count Fucking Dracula. First among Brides, the Count ain’t some possessive asshole, but his reputation does precede him. On a midsummer night in 1995, that reputation led Ken Salk — the boss of a mickey mouse crew called the Desert Raiders — to track down the Count after a half-dozen drug sales were disrupted by a crazy, hulking nightmare in a leather trench coat. But Salk was only human, and that night was the last that’d be true. Apparently, the Count saw something in the scrawny little fucker, so the Big D Embraced him. Thus, the first Bride was deflowered. Soon, other Kindred followed in Ken’s wake, a tide of Licks brave enough to stand in the Count’s seven-foot-seven shadow. They organized, the strong ripped away from the weak and the sharks pulled from the waves, and the Count began to build his army.

              Or that’s the word we hear from the Mother Chapter. Sure, everyone claims they’ve met the Count, but he’s like a cryptid: You always just miss him no matter how hard you look. Everyone has an opinion on where he’s currently hiding and what he really wants. If he needs to send down orders, they’re always through the Mother Chapter, but orders are so rare that no one bats an eye about never hearing from the Count directly.

              Once Salk remade his gang, they began roaming the continental US looking for recruits. They’d “patch” the baddest motherfuckers in each town they rode through, leaving them behind to spread the word. These badasses, in turn, made more badasses, and soon, there were chapters all across North America, reaching from Mexico to the long highways of Canada. Expansion into the former set off our first and (thus far) only turf war. The Bruja bloodline and their biker thralls had deep roots all over the Southwest, so the Mother Chapter ordered a hostile takeover. That provided us the bloodline’s smuggling routes, drug chemists, hogs, and most of its membership, as well as a more intimate understanding of Kindred society. Now we had everything we’d needed to prepare for the tribulation ahead.

              Tonight, we wait for the war to come, remaking ourselves into an army that can survive without supervision, an army that can be ready for anything and everything humanity might throw at us. The All Night Society is changing, and not for the better. The beasts of the dark have grown too obsessed with politics, hunting merely to survive. The Count wouldn’t abide that — and neither should you.

              Our practices

              We’re organized into chapters overseen by Salk and his childer in the Mother Chapter. We ain’t no democracy, and that means you follow the rules — all of them. There are a lot, but most treat on how to deal with civvies and how to properly contaminate any potential crime scenes you happen to make whilst minding your own goddamn business. You might also be called to war, driving a state or two over to fuck up a domain, protect your sister chapters, or just fire bomb some rich prick’s haven.

              Most importantly, you wear your cut, and until you meet the Final Death, you don’t take it off. You patch it with your colors: the skull to show you’re a Bride, logos for your local chapter, and then all the flair you earn for being a badass. Crash Elysium? That’s a patch. Wipe out a police station on your lonesome? That’s a patch. Think up something so awful we ain’t got a patch for it? That’s a fucking patch. Collect them all, you creepy bastard. ’Course, the baddest of them all are those who wear the Red Tooth. You only get that for eating a soul, and you’ve not seen a riot till you witness a chapter celebrating some newbie popping her cherry.

              Our most important practice is the rally. A rally is food, folks, and fun, a place we can shoot the shit or plan the next big kill. Sometimes, we put on our own events, drawing Licks from miles around to take in the bloodshed, but mostly, these are private affairs, or ways for chapters to settle scores on an even playing field. Otherwise, we take to the mortal circuit, preying on drunk Hell’s Angels as they cheer us on. Oh yeah, they know all about us. Nothing draws a crowd like the Brides of Dracula. Most don’t take us for actual vampires, but we play up the spooky shit for the crowd. Bonus points if the Masquerade police show up and you run over some Invictus dirtbag with your ride (you better believe that’s a patch).

              But for all the rules, all the rallies, all the fighting, the most important thing is freedom. If you aren’t being called on to do something by your chapter president, or someone higher up on the food chain, you can do whatever the fuck you like. Usually that means getting involved with drugs, or maybe an extortion racket or two — this is a gang, after all. Any money you earn is yours to keep, save for a small wealth tax when the Mother Chapter needs to do some fundraising. But hey, if you’re running low, there are other ways to contribute. The expectation, of course, is that you’re gonna share with your crew the same way you’d share with a brother or a sister — or a sibling, if you like (the Count don’t care what’s in your pants). You know how to fix up bikes? Be a good Bride and help out changing oil and fixing gearshifts. You know how to cook? Great — whip up the best damn meth in the state and make the whole chapter filthy rich.

              If you’ve got a cut, you’re your own Bride, just like the Count. A real one-percenter type. You put in the work when you’re asked, and you work hard. CEO mindset. Once that’s done, no one’s gonna bat an eye if you play so hard you leave a few bodies in your wake. You didn’t just earn it: You’re entitled to it.



              Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

              Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
              Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
              Storytellers Vault: Author Page

              Comment


              • #67
                Okay, let's have a look at the Society of the Accord!

                As I've said elsewhere, this clan book series has also been a stealth update of various bits and bobs from The Danse Macabre, which, for my money, is one of the best supplements White Wolf ever put out for a vampire-related TTRPG. Apart from things like banes (and gargoyles, who we'll get to soon), my major focus has been to give the covenants from that book a 2E polish. I'd like to go through all of those factions eventually (including the third-tier versions of the big five), but that's a discussion for another day!

                The Society of the Accord is a cult/self-help group that believes it's better to come to an understanding with their Beasts rather than outright repressing them. That concept hasn't changed too much from the original presentation, but we did significantly alter their mechanical benefit: The Treaties. Originally, Treaties were Coils of the Dragon-like Disciplines, and while that was by no means a bad way of representing their abilities, we had a few reasons for wanting to scrap that system. For one, we've kinda done "not-Coil" powers a lot in this series, and while that doesn't necessarily preclude doing more (and indeed, you'll see some in Bloodlines: The Ageless), I wanted to see if there were better ways to accomplish the thematic goals of the concept using different mechanics. We also felt that, by their nature, "treaties" aren't really permanent things you just get to have. A Coil is a permanent alteration of your Curse, but a Treaty is a contract with terms and responsibilities.

                To that end, the author took a page from the Carthians and the Invictus, using a sort of "Oaths meets Laws" structure. Treaties are an agreement between a vampire and her Beast, but they're also only accomplished through collective action; i.e., Dialogs, the bloody, dangerous rites Hellions conduct to satisfy their side of the bargain with the Beast.

                The Accord fit very well with a Gangrel book, not only because of the obvious thematic connection, but also because they're a chance to explore a different side of the clan. Not all Hellions are Savages, of course, but those who do join the covenant represent a more intellectual side of their lineage while still being ridiculously bloody.

                Without further ado, here's the Society of the Accord. I think I'll probably take Saturday off again, but I should be back on Sunday with a ghoul family!

                The Society of the Accord: The Hellions

                "You're just in time for your session! Start running."

                You want to join the Society of the Accord because

                You’re tired of fighting the Beast. You want to apply modern psychology to the Kindred condition. You chafe against the Traditions. You’re not ashamed of being a monster.

                The big picture

                Every vampire suffers from the Beast’s urgings. Indeed, traditional wisdom within the All Night Society states that it must be resisted and denied at every turn. Pity the poor predator burdened by her instincts: Woe is the restless dead, cursed with immortality and chained to a monster. It’s enough to make you lie recumbent in your haven with the curtains open.

                Isn’t that just so insufferably Victorian? The world has moved beyond such moral self-flagellation. There’s so much more now that we understand about the human condition, and we know wallowing in misery just drives you deeper into it. And, being once human, these new ideas of psychology almost certainly apply to the Kindred. These are foundational principles for the Society of the Accord, to open a dialog between the Man and the Other. Beast is such a sinister name for a constant companion — and do you really want to alienate such a valuable ally?

                It sounds noble enough on paper, but there’s a certain old adage about what you pave the road to Hell with. The Hellions do have means to keep the Beast under control, to some extent, but they do so through brutal games of bloodshed and dominance. They drape themselves in layers of symbolism and ritual to hide their cruelty, but there are only so many ways you can dress up chasing around members of your covenant until they fear for their Requiems, ending with an orgy of frenzy on both sides of the equation.

                Between the violence they bring in their wake and their philosophy sharing more than a few similarities with, oh, say, Belial’s Brood, the Psychonauts prefer to keep their practices secret. This, so far, has kept the Society of the Accord from ever growing beyond an underground counterculture. Lost neonates and disaffected ancillae, unhappy with the stifling hierarchies and expectations of the larger covenants, are the most likely to join, often scouted out by senior members when their dissatisfaction becomes clear. Elders are rare, as Hellions tend to have a short shelf life. Accidents happen, after all. A careless cleanup draws negative attention from the Prince, or maybe the Society is finally considered more trouble than they’re worth. That, and massive murder rate spikes invariably result in a few mortals with a grudge.

                Nevertheless, if you ask a Hellion, it’s better to have a happy-but-short death than a long, uncomfortable immortality. The Society has a reputation for relentless hedonism, and that’s not unearned, but they’re not without sense, and those who buy into the rumors of being one step away from draugr would be surprised by the academic bent their teachings take. Then again, so much of the Kindred condition is monstrosity draped in pretty language and posturing at humanity. They’re just taking a different route.

                Where we came from

                A desire to escape the negative effects of the Beast has existed for as long as the Kindred. Rumors have circulated for centuries of vampires who manage to do this, though substantive proof has been thin on the ground, usually explained away as the saintly vampire being a hermit. This state of enlightenment has been referred to as “Golconda” in modern times, though it’s rejected by most covenants as idealistic at best and dangerous at worst.

                The Society of the Accord is perhaps the longest-lasting Golconda cult — not that we use the word cult. That’s a loaded term. Still, by Kindred standards, our Society is young. We started as small, isolated secret societies with wildly varying practices. Few left any records, but there were always just enough left in the ashes to spark further interest in Golconda. The Apostles of the Destroying Angels were the first group to commit their ideas to writing, but their theory that the Beast was an angel of death tethered to a vampire’s corpse proved… unpopular with the Sanctified; the idea that sufficient prayer and carefully applied violence could appease the angel even less so. Yet, while the Church might’ve been able to put the Apostles’ havens to the torch, their treatises survived. Now their practice of letting the Beast speak through frenzy is our own, though trying to say it’s some divinely sent power, or that whatever it kills deserves it, is a superstition best left in the past. Or at least, don’t give it too much credit.

                Later, the Brotherhood of Enlightened Predation, inspired by their mortal contemporaries in London hellfire clubs, started as a way for Kindred gentry to have just a few moments of wild indulgence after the first few decades of death got dull. One infamous and particularly wild night left the Brotherhood with several newly risen revenants in their care, and while the experiments conducted on these pseudo-vampires did prove useful in furthering an understanding of the role of hunger in controlling the Beast, the secondary result of keeping around abused, ravenous monsters without proper safety precautions was entirely predictable. However, there were enough survivors who kept an interest in the academic study of the vampiric psyche to form the earliest version of what we now call the Society of the Accord.

                These nights, the Hellions have learned from their predecessors and remain sparse. The most optimistic of us believed the Internet might give us a shot in the arm and provide an easier way to spread our teachings, but this hasn’t panned out over the past thirty years, and it seems unlikely to bear fruit in the future. The All Night Society is loath to change, and a group that flies against the Traditions as much as we do isn’t exactly predisposed to gaining any real footholds.

                Tonight, we’ve begun to adopt the trappings of psychoanalysis and self-help as a framing device for our practices. It’s a happy coincidence that cognitive behavioral therapy strongly resembles the reasoning behind our Dialogs, though a human therapy session would typically have less murder involved — how dull!

                Our practices

                All vampires have an inner impulse that drives them from Humanity. You can frame it as a metaphor, and we certainly do try to personify it (for better or worse), but its existence is a practical reality whether you like it or not. That “something” takes over in times of heightened emotions, tearing away the façade of the Man to leave the monster underneath. What sets the Society of the Accord apart from other Kindred is that we believe we can reason with that monster.

                Hellions keep a fragile peace with the Beast through a regimen of reward and punishment. Some nights, we gather together for a feeding frenzy, or force ourselves to face what the Other fears most, whether that be fire or emotional agony. Sometimes we just hunt each other to bring our instincts to the forefront. Regardless of the means, it’s always a night to remember, if only for the destruction it leaves behind. These occasions are called “Dialogs,” and outsiders are rarely invited, if only because such events tend to provide excellent blackmail material.

                Gatherings of Hellions are called Voleries, and for many, the Volery replaces the coterie as a primary social unit. Within the Volery, there are several positions that fully initiated members can work within, though these are not static. The Navigator is in charge of a night’s Dialog, the Advocate gives voice to the participants’ Beasts, and the Cleaner works to keep the Masquerade in place in the typically violent aftermath.

                One reason we prefer to stick together is that the idea of ceding ground to the Beast goes against what most covenants teach. The problem is, doing so produces results. Ask a Hellion and they’ll say the traditional treatment of the Beast gets the “stick” part of the equation right by denying what it wants — but if you beat an animal enough, it only obeys out of fear. And once that fear is gone, you’ll live just long enough to regret it.

                Dialogs, however, provide the carrot. The Beast wants blood, a chance to show its dominance, or to be let off its leash for a few moments. More often than not, this involves casualties, and those casualties aren’t always human. Usually, we let prospective members who’ve earned our trust have just a small taste of what’s to come by accompanying us on a hunt. The first taste is free, no questions asked, and most end up coming back again. Otherwise, we put newcomers through a gauntlet where senior members are whipped into frenzy, with the potential initiate being hunted until they, too, fall to the Other. We even provide medical aid for all involved parties afterward. We might be monsters, but we’re civilized ones.

                Once you’ve survived that, the sky’s the limit. Everyone’s path to forming a relationship with their Beast is a bit different, but we have a few favorites. Starvation brings the Beast to the forefront, but just to make sure you don’t try to break your fast too early, we provide a saferoom. The key is ours, though, not yours, and the locks are for your own safety. Hey, you’ll get out eventually. Some nights, we wait for the dawn outside a haven to see whoever can stand the sunlight the longest before fleeing to safety. The winner gets the first taste of blood on the next hunt; the loser gets to be the one who tries to break in through barred doors.

                But the hunts are really the main draw. You, a few other members of the Volery, a gathering of humans, no witnesses, and no survivors. It’s always worth the wait. Ultimately, the Man must learn that the Beast is his companion, one that cannot be controlled or ignored. The desire to stand over a pile of flesh that used to be a person while licking the blood from your fangs isn’t something to be ashamed of. There’s nothing wrong with wanting to take some harpy’s head off his shoulders after the way he insulted you last year — everyone knows he’s a prick and would deserve it. Those impulses to kill and dominate are just part of being a vampire, and the harder you try to fight them, the worse the Other will be when it finally gets free. With us, you get to choose the time and place to do these things. Better yet, you get to do it with backup. Until then, we’ll hold some space for you to listen to all of those nasty little impulses you’ve been trying to hold back.

                The end result of a Dialog is a Treaty — the Accord — where the Man and the Other reach an understanding. It’s not a friendship by any means; it’s more akin to a relationship between a falconer and her bird. The bird has no real love for this person, but it understands that following orders means its needs will be fulfilled, so it doesn’t lash out and harm its master. Conversely, the falconer must understand the fragility of this relationship and not test its limits. In the end, there’s peace.

                It’s happy enough, and that’s what matters. Can you really hope for anything more?

                Treaties

                The pinnacles of a Hellion’s meditative work are Treaties, abilities that alter her relationship with the Other and its needs: It becomes more patient, less likely to frenzy, and more flexible in the face of threats. While frenzy is the most readily obvious of the Beast’s manifestations, Treaties rarely empower its use. Rather, the Society of the Accord allows for a greater finesse over what the Beast can do.

                Only a vampire with Status in the Society of the Accord can purchase these Merits, and he must prove his commitment if he wants to gain the most potent of them. To learn any given Treaty, a vampire must have a Status equal to at least one less than a Treaty’s rating, to a minimum of one dot. For example, a character with three dots of Hellion Status can purchase 1–4-dot Treaties, but he cannot purchase any 5-dot ones. He must also participate in an appropriate Dialog (below).

                Dialogs

                Keeping up with your Treaties takes work, and to remain in good standing with the Other, a Hellion must participate in Dialogs.

                There are three classes of Dialog recognized by the Hellions, each representing a different aspect of the Beast: Anger, Fear, and Need. Each Treaty is keyed to a different Dialog type. The Accord describes Dialogs in dualistic terms, with each pole representing an “argument” for humanity or bestiality. A Hellion is said to be Humane, for example, if she refrains from draining a victim to death, whereas she’s Bestial if she does the opposite. These Dialogs are an ongoing rapport between the Man and the Other.

                Participation in the appropriate Dialog preserves any corresponding Treaties for one lunar month, and these rituals are never performed alone. As such, at least three Hellions must be involved with a Dialog for it to be considered successful; typically, this involves a Navigator, an Advocate, and a Cleaner, but smaller Voleries can muddle through without these specialized roles.

                A Dialog must employ at least one of the following elements of the appropriate type. Characters must contribute as many elements as Treaty types they have, or else those they neglect are not considered to be renewed. As such, Psychonauts tend to focus on one Treaty type over the others, though jacks-of-all-trades aren’t unheard of.

                Dialogs of Anger

                Participating in a collective hunt. Allowing a Volery member to taunt or humiliate you to the point of frenzy. Engaging in combat with another member until inflicting at least three points of lethal damage to each other.

                Dialogs of Fear

                Facing exposure to a bane. Allowing multiple Volery members to lash out at you. Playing the part of prey during a mock hunt.

                Dialogs of Need

                Cornering a group of humans and feeding to excess. Locking yourself in a room and avoiding feeding until starving. Facing frenzy due to hunger. Spending a night communing with a burrow of revenants.



                Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

                Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
                Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
                Storytellers Vault: Author Page

                Comment


                • #68
                  Alright, let's dig into some ghoul families.

                  One minor goal I've had with ghoul families has been to update all the First Edition clan ones, but, to my knowledge, there aren't any Gangrel ghoul families in Requiem 1E, even in the original Ghouls sourcebook. The only one that comes close is the Alleymen, who, in addition to being Ventrue despite REALLY feeling like Gangrel, were updated as a kind of ghoul in Half-Damned. In some alternate reality, had they not been covered already, I might have nicked them off the Lords, but that's neither here nor there.

                  Which is a long way of saying that the three ghoul families who appear in Wild Hunt are wholly original creations. Let's begin with the Midnight Wolves.

                  So, one thing I particularly like about ghoul families in Second Edition (both in the core and Half-Damned) is that they have a lot more agency. In First Edition, they were too often hapless victims with little say in their lot in life, and I think 2E makes them far more viable as protagonist characters, along with ghouls in general. In that context, a family like the Midnight Wolves was a natural next step.

                  The Mad Dogs act as bounty hunters cum protection racketeers for the All Night Society, riding roughshod as modern-night cowboys. That's a pretty strong concept, and, as such, this family probably had the least amount of ink spilled on it through development. They originally were a bit too much like the Brides of Dracula, though, so we gave that mercenary aspect more emphasis, which provided them a more distinct niche. I also added their special Merit late in development, because I forgot how cool Taste of the Wild is; those ghoul Merits in the core are all great in general. That was inspired by the third sample character in the write-up, who's the first non-human member of a ghoul family we've done. I absolutely loved that idea, and the author injected a lot of pathos into it. It's also just a great plot hook in general.

                  Tomorrow, I'll be back with the Champions of the Neo-American Wrestling Alliance.

                  Midnight Wolves: The ones with something to prove

                  "You’re a funny guy. Tell me another after I feed you your fangs."


                  Your motorcycle growls like a wild animal as the highway disappears beneath you toward a blood-red horizon. A road sign flashes through your periphery; the bar’s coming up. You kick the gearshift and cruise on in to rest your ride along with a dozen others parked outside. You’re hungry, but business comes first.

                  The door creaks open and a dozen sets of eyes turn to regard you. The bartender doesn’t look up. She knows better than to get involved. This isn’t the first time she’s seen you, and besides, she knows you’re good to cover the damage.

                  Your black, steel-toed boots drum a sluggish beat against the dirty tile floor. You approach the biggest, meanest-looking motherfucker in the bar, the one with a price on his head in three domains.

                  “There are two ways this can go down: quick or fun,” you say.

                  The biggest, meanest-looking motherfucker laughs, fangs flashing in the dull neon of old beer signs. The whole table stands, and they surround you. Someone glasses you from behind and you stagger, shards biting into your scalp. You reach a hand up and it comes away slick with red. Adrenaline surges through you like a guitar riff, and you smile.
                  Looks like you get to eat after all.


                  Where we came from

                  Typically, the more established a ghoul family is, the longer it’s been around. Many Kindred respect ghouls as members of the All Night Society — not necessarily as members of equal rank, but even the most prestigious families have to build connections and infrastructure to become valuable assets to their regnants. The Midnight Wolves stand in sharp contrast.

                  In the early-1800s, way out in what’s now Colorado, a Savage called Mary Quick fancied herself an outlaw. This wasn’t especially common among the dead, as daylight tended to complicate matters, but Mary wasn’t easily deterred. She found herself a posse of smalltime cattle rustlers led by a dude named Jack Beaumont. Jack was smart enough to recognize a good offer when it sauntered into camp and punched him in the gut, and that’s how Mary found her first Midnight Wolves.

                  It didn’t take long for them to become public enemies on the frontier, less for their actual robberies and more for what they did to anyone who tried to bring them to justice. But after a few years of building their reputation, Jack and his boys started to feel restless. The power Mary gave them was like nothing they could’ve imagined, but it was only a taste. The frontier was growing smaller every day, and Kindred influence crept ever westward along with it. It wasn’t hard to find vampires who were interested in some established muscle who could take care of business at high noon, and that’s how the Mad Dogs pushed into Nevada and California.

                  As for Mary? Jack always claimed she got tired of the outlaw life, but no one’s heard from her since around the Gold Rush. Still, her legacy lives on in a gang of Bloodhounds, ones who’ll still do just about anything to prove themselves.

                  Who we are tonight

                  The Midnight Wolves are the last surviving vestige of the American frontier, cowboys and killers who won’t accept the quiet lives of city folk. Sure, they traded in their horses and six-shooters for Harleys and sawed-offs, but the thirst for violence remains. Still, violence in and of itself is usually only a means to an end, and the Bloodhounds have repurposed yet another aspect of their frontier past: bounty hunting. This provides them just enough cover for all the hellraising that actually interests them. Midnight Wolves use their ability to operate over daylight hours to track and corner Kindred outlaws, whether those who pissed off the authorities or just those Licks who have high-roller enemies. If you’ve got enough cash and Vitae, you can buy a Bloodhound.

                  Wolf gangs are common all across the Pacific Coast and American Southwest, most of which are based out of dive bars, mob casinos, and other nexuses of human misery. There aren’t many Midnight Wolves who care to waste their time actually running a business, but fortunately for them, plenty of humans are willing to pay for protection, or Kindred who'll tolerate their rowdiness if it means having reliable goons to handle their enemies.

                  Other than whichever dead man’s paying for them tonight, their command structure is non-existent; worrying about seniority is for First Estate pencil necks, and money doesn’t count for much if you aren’t strong enough to keep it.

                  Contrary to popular belief, however, Mad Dogs aren’t stupid, and they don’t have a death wish. Few among their number go around antagonizing the entire All Night Society, and the ones who do invariably meet violent and lonely ends. Brass knuckles can only do so much against blood sorcery or Protean claws. That’s why they hunt in packs, and that’s also why they keep their noses clean, at least when it comes to the Danse Macabre.

                  But Midnight Wolves who’ve been around for a while all too often lose their headstrong bravado. While their family is defined by the drive to prove itself, those jaded few are the ones who’ve realized exactly where they fit in the world. There’s a reason that the rest of the cowboys died out.

                  Nicknames: Bloodhounds, Mad Dogs (derogatory)

                  Touchstone: A gang’s leader is treated as its Touchstone.

                  Benefit: Midnight Wolves never back down, not even in a hopeless fight. After taking lethal damage in a scene, a Bloodhound’s unarmed attacks deal +0 lethal damage instead of bashing for the remainder of the scene, including to vampires. In addition, Bloodhounds gain the Taste of the Wild Merit (Vampire, p. 298) for free at character creation.
                  Drawback: Midnight Wolves never back down, not even in a pointless fight. After taking lethal damage in a scene, a Bloodhound must spend a Vitae to exit the scene non-violently or to retreat from a fight before it ends. Otherwise, she gains the Broken Condition.

                  Drawback: [REDACTED]

                  Stereotypes:
                  • Daeva: Look, but don’t touch. Especially if you don’t have the cash.
                  • Gangrel: We’ll try to kill each other sometimes, but hey, that’s family.
                  • Mekhet: Rodents.
                  • Nosferatu: Outsiders, like us.
                  • Ventrue: Never trust anybody who talks that much.



                  Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

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                  • #69
                    A good Monday to you all. Time for another ghoul family: The Neo-American Wrestling Alliance (henceforth, NAWA)!

                    I don't have much to say here, other than to note that this was an exceptionally fun concept. There was a bit of retooling from the initial drafts, mostly in regard to how they interact with the All Night Society, but I'm really happy with how it all shook out. I particularly like that this is a ghoul family that applies its gifts of the Blood to more (kind of) practical ends, using their high durability as ghouls to perform sick stunts that would more or less kill mortal wrestlers. And if the local Kindred get a nice, rowdy crowd to sup upon? So much the better.

                    I also want to call out the illustration of this family as being one of my favourites in the book (linked on the STV product paged). Luchadores and vampires go together like a metaphor for things that go well together.

                    So, here are the NAWA, and tomorrow I'll be back with the Redwater Bay Police.

                    NAWA: The ones you cheer for

                    "Ever cut loose for a crowd of thousands? No feeling like it."


                    Neon lights and LED screens fill the stadium with contrasting electric songs, and the rumble of the crowd that’s swelling in the bleachers is choral accompaniment — music to your ears.

                    You never feel more alive than on fight night. All those people chanting your name as you ricochet someone’s face off the turnstile? There’s no other high that can compare. Not from before your first taste, or after.

                    Sometimes you still think back to the life you left behind, the one with the bank job you hated and the fiancé who was screwing his way through the apartment building. Then your intro music comes on and the stadium roars. You wonder if gladiators ever felt this good, and you make a note to ask the boss about it later. After all, the boss used to be one.

                    But right now, your public awaits.


                    Where we came from

                    Maxine Donahue founded the Neo-American Wrestling Alliance for one purpose: to make modern gladiators for a modern world. If you catch her in a good mood, she’ll regale you with stories of her time back in the arena; just don’t make the mistake of asking her about anything else from back then, or her good mood will cease and your lifespan will quickly follow.

                    These nights, there aren’t many Kindred around who actually lived through the fall of Rome, and ghouls from back then are basically unheard of. “Maxine Donahue” isn’t exactly a Latin name, and there are some vampires who think she’s full of shit, but most of them are also smart enough not to say that to her face.

                    But Maxine is the real deal. She was a Gallic slave in her old life, and some asshole thought it would be amusing to put a dull sword in her hands and watch a scrawny girl fight a real gladiator. No one was laughing when that scrawny girl ripped his throat out with her teeth. Even back then, she knew how to get the audience’s attention.

                    Among that audience was the Gangrel who would become her regnant, a vampire named Borso. Borso purchased her, taught her how to be a real champion of the ring, and then eventually sponsored her so she could really test her mettle. She didn’t disappoint, and as the girl’s star rose, Borso started to see her as more than just a simple asset. The story goes that he offered to Embrace her, but she turned him down for reasons she doesn’t care to explain. She still accepted the gift of his Blood, and the moment she tasted it, she was truly born as the first Champion.

                    At least, that’s how she tells it. Embellishment is part of the job.

                    The two of them fled the fall of Rome and traveled the world together. Every century or so she’d adopt a new identity to fit the times and whichever culture they found themselves in. If she flourished in the ring, it was nothing compared to when she stepped out of it. With each passing decade she came more into her own, and everywhere they went, she’d find a crowd that was happy to watch two people beat the shit out of each other. That’s how their stable of Champions grew; she would look for the fighters who could hold their own while still putting on a show, then make them an offer. Eventually, their new family settled in America, a place that really knew how to appreciate violence. That’s where she first learned of modern professional wrestling, the “evolution” of the gladiatorial fights of her old life, something that elevated arena combat to an art form. And with Vitae powering her Champions, it meant they could put on a show unlike any a human wrestling organization could ever hope to do. She would make superstars.

                    Yet as Maxine grew brighter, Borso only seemed to fade deeper into the shadows. He’s still around, at least as far as anyone knows, but it’s been a hundred years since anyone’s actually seen him. The way Maxine tells it, he just doesn’t care to see anyone but her most nights, and no one is in a position to argue the point. It’s a common joke among some Kindred that Maxine was the real vampire all along, and Borso was her ghoul. Other Kindred don’t think it’s much of a joke.

                    Who we are tonight

                    The Neo-American Wrestling Alliance is one of the top promotions in the business. Many Kindred weren’t too crazy about Maxine’s scheme to broadcast her employees’ death-defying abilities to a general audience, but hey, most professional wrestling outfits were already doing shit in the ring that should kill normal people. Besides, everybody knows wrestling is fake.

                    That aside, even her most vocal critics have to admit they put on one hell of a show. It’s no surprise that NAWA became an overnight sensation, especially with a little support from the shadows. Even vampires with no interest in wrestling can still benefit from a room full of rowdy, drunk humans. It’s better still if all those humans have a built-in excuse not to question anything weird that they might notice (“Is that guy drinking that chick’s blood?! Great production values!”). If a NAWA show is coming to town, chances are the local Kindred paid big for a buffet.

                    Don’t misunderstand, though. Plenty of Licks love the show even more than the kine do, Gangrel especially. Even if the matches are staged to have a certain ending, that flying elbow off the top of the cage and the sound of a collarbone shattering is pretty fucking real. And a little Vitae will make sure you can see it all again the next night. The Blood’s way better for your health than steroids, and you really don’t have to worry about a stunt coordinator if you can just unbreak your neck.

                    That’s part of the problem. Some night soon, a point may come when the audience will start really seeing past the kayfabe. If that point does exist, Maxine seems fixated on finding it. If she succeeds, she’ll finally find a fight she can’t win for the first time in her very long life.

                    Nicknames: Champions, Champs, Borso’s Beasts (among themselves)

                    Touchstone: Maxine Donahue, founder, CEO, and public face of the company. Sometimes she even gets in the ring, and for that, her Champs love her all the more.

                    Benefit: [REDACTED]

                    Drawback: Drawing a crowd isn’t always what it’s cut up to be, especially if they start showing up at your apartment. Rolls to find or identify Champions enjoy a +2 modifier, which compounds with any dots of Fame she might have. Furthermore, at the beginning of a chapter, the Storyteller rolls a single die. If the result is a success, she can introduce an unexpected and dramatic complication for the Champion at any point during that chapter. For example, if the wrestler is attempting to move through a building without being noticed, he might run into one of his biggest fans who recognizes him on the spot. If he wants to get information at a bar, then maybe one of the other patrons decides to see how tough he really is. This complication should not constitute an immediate failure, but it should force the Champion to think on her feet.

                    Stereotypes:
                    • Daeva: In this business, you’ve gotta respect a good face.
                    • Gangrel: The only ones who really know what it means to let go.
                    • Mekhet: They help us draw a crowd; in return, they get a crowd to skulk in.
                    • Nosferatu: Horror storylines are big right now.
                    • Ventrue: Tough as hell, and damn do they know how to work an audience.





                    Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

                    Actual Play: Vampire: The Requiem – Bloodlines
                    Masquiem: Curses of Caine in Requiem 2nd
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                    • #70
                      Wrestling always seems to be that field where supernaturals blunge into mortal society, and I love the idea for that.

                      Aaand now I know what to base my ideas of Wuxia martial arts clan ghoul families on if I ever exert myself to start typing


                      MtAw Homebrew:
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                      New 2E Legacies, expanded

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by 21C Hermit View Post
                        Wrestling always seems to be that field where supernaturals blunge into mortal society, and I love the idea for that.

                        Aaand now I know what to base my ideas of Wuxia martial arts clan ghoul families on if I ever exert myself to start typing
                        Surrealists get proven wrong at wrestlign matches.


                        Kelly R.S. Steele, Freelance Writer(Feel free to call me Kelly, Arcane, or Arc)
                        The world is not beautiful, therefore it is.-Keiichi Sigsawa, Kino's Journey
                        Feminine pronouns, please.

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by ArcaneArts View Post
                          Surrealists get proven wrong at wrestlign matches.
                          Nothing wraps up a debate like a good ol’ fisticuff.

                          Speaking of which, the God-Machin— I mean, YouTube’s algorithms just started recommending to me the “Nanomachines, son!” meme videos. Hmm… biomechanical Gangrel with nanotech Protean…


                          MtAw Homebrew:
                          Even more Legacies, updated to 2E
                          New 2E Legacies, expanded

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                          • #73
                            Alright, final ghoul family today: the Redwater Bay Police.

                            This is probably the most overtly antagonistic ghoul family we've done, and also the most specific to a particular setting. Among the NMD writers, I'm a bit notorious for kiboshing "vampires secretly being behind real events" story hooks (hate 'em!), but I do like story hooks where vampires are pushing their luck on the Masquerade in such a way that things will almost certainly go horribly wrong. The RBPD is a great example of that hook in action (as is the NAWA, come to think of it). We don't explicitly state the kind of trouble they'll be bringing down sooner or later, but I think we included a few good hooks on how to make it happen.

                            Not too much to say about development. I had remembered there being bigger changes in development, but this was actually closer to the first draft than I recalled. The only big change was adding their Merit, which I actually think would make a good general benefit for certain kinds of Invictus ghouls.

                            Now that we're through the ghouls, next I think I'm going to break tradition slightly and pull some stuff out of the Merits/Devotions/etc. chapter. We've got a lot of fun systems this time around. This will also give me an excuse to talk about what we did with the Red Surrender...

                            Redwater Bay Police: The ones who maintain order

                            "Alright, sir, start from the top. Tell me exactly what you think you saw."


                            It’s a Tuesday night in the middle of July, and Redwater Bay is as peaceful as ever.

                            It’s the kind of place where parents don’t have to worry about what their kids are getting up to; the police keep the neighborhood safe, and they have the statistics to prove it.
                            Redwater’s got the lowest violent crime numbers in the state, and even vandalism is virtually unheard of. Of course, every so often, a family does up and move out of town without so much as a goodbye. But these things happen, and most folks have come to agree that it’s perfectly normal.

                            Yes, the police in that precinct really are a credit to their uniform. So why is it that anytime you see an officer, all the little hairs on the back of your neck stand on end? If they make eye contact, you feel an animal compulsion to run and hide, like a rabbit staring down a wolf. They’ll smile, and you’ll smile back, but all you can think of is a predator showing his fangs. It’s probably nothing. Authority figures are always a little intimidating…

                            It’s a Tuesday night in the middle of July, and Redwater Bay is as peaceful as ever. Just make sure the cops don’t have a reason to knock on your door.


                            Where we came from

                            While it’s common practice for Kindred to enthrall powerful humans, typically, vampires won’t go to the effort of juicing up just any public servant who’s under their influence. It’s just not a good investment. So, in the late 1990s, when an Invictus Savage named Rochelle Abara made exactly that investment with her city’s entire police precinct, it drew a lot of skepticism from her peers in the First Estate. But Rochelle knew potential when she saw it, and if you don’t take some risks sometimes, you’ll never get your reward.

                            That reward took the form of Noelle Rathborne, an up-and-coming sergeant who was ambitious to the point of hunger; she was the kind of person who desperately craved power over others — just the sort of person you want as a cop — and she saw her position as an ideal avenue to pursue that goal. However, with whispers of brutal tactics and “missing” evidence threatening to end her career, Rochelle saw a chance for leverage.

                            It wasn’t the first time a suit tried to offer Noelle a deal, but it was the first time she was genuinely interested in the possibilities. Her new regnant promised her a whole precinct of unquestionably loyal officers: They would keep the peace however they saw fit, and in return, they would clean up after any messes other Kindred left in their territory. Sometimes that meant dissolving body parts in rubber bins behind a hardware store; sometimes it meant scrubbing blood spatter out of shag carpet; and sometimes, it meant “bringing someone in for questioning” on special request.

                            It didn’t take long for the crime statistics in Redwater Bay to become something other precincts only aspire to. It does help quite a bit when your officers are erasing the evidence of vampire-related murders or disappearances, but then, every precinct will pad its numbers in one way or another.

                            Who we are tonight

                            Since Captain Rathborne took over, Redwater Bay has seen very little staff turnover, and anyone who might inquire about that gets pretty much the same answer: Noelle runs a tight ship, and she demands both loyalty and dedication from her officers. People who keep asking questions are prone to suffering messy accidents, or taking all-expenses-paid vacations to sulfuric acid baths.

                            The residents of the neighborhood all seem thrilled with this turn of events. Honestly, a little too excited, as if they’re putting on a performance for someone in the cheap seats. If anyone points this out, they’re quick to laugh it off and change the subject. They all know, on some level, that the police don’t tolerate dissenters.

                            As for Rochelle Abara, she’s happily reaped the fruits of her efforts for years, but she hasn’t repeated it yet. A few decades isn’t that long in a Requiem, and there’s still one important thing she needs to know: What happens when people start realizing none of Redwater Bay’s police officers are aging? Yes, there are ways of making sure no one looks too hard, but even a Savage knows to respect that old adage about not shitting where you eat. The First Tradition must be respected, and if it isn’t, it might be time for Captain Rathborne to take a well-deserved retirement.

                            Nicknames: Rooks (among the Invictus), Pigs (among everyone else), RBPD

                            Touchstone: Captain Noelle Rathborne serves as her precinct’s Touchstone, as she takes a personal interest in every bloody detail her officers handle.

                            Benefit: [REDACTED]

                            Drawback: Redwater Bay police officers take after their scheming regnant and, as such, they feel more connected to Kindred and other ghouls than they do to humans. Rooks lose the 10-again quality for all Empathy, Persuasion, and Socialize rolls made against humans who don’t relate to their current assignments.

                            Stereotypes:
                            • Daeva: You think Gangrel make a mess? Try cleaning up after a Serpent’s house party.
                            • Gangrel: Then again, if you do get a call from a Savage, bring a shovel and a bottle of bleach. Trust me.
                            • Mekhet: If I say, “Follow up on a lead,” I mean, “Talk to a Shadow.”
                            • Nosferatu: For a few favors, a beat cop’s best friend. Probably won’t care for the favors, though.
                            • Ventrue: Don’t expect a soft touch, but it never hurts to know the DA’s domme.
                            New Merit: Qualified Immunity (••)

                            Prerequisite:
                            Redwater Bay Police

                            Effect: Not only does your character benefit from the usual code of silence among cops, she’s one of Rochelle’s favorites, and her regnant’s Invictus connections provide her a means to take far more extreme action in the name of “justice.” Whenever she performs an illegal act to preserve the Masquerade, the Conspiracy of Silence will make any complications go away, provided she doesn’t leave too much of a mess.

                            Drawback: Rochelle’s influence only goes so far. Your character should make sure to repay any big favors in kind, or else she’ll be assigned to something much worse than desk duty.



                            Social justice vampire/freelancer | He/Him

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Yossarian View Post
                              I also want to call out the illustration of this family as being one of my favourites in the book (linked on the STV product paged). Luchadores and vampires go together like a metaphor for things that go well together.
                              I like it, too. It is really different from most of what I've contributed so far! And while on the subject of art I contributed to this book, I was very happy you were on board with giving the Redwater Bay ghoul the iconic "BITCH" shirt from Bloodlines. I love that stupid shirt, and it brought me immense joy sneaking it into the book!

                              And I'm interested to hear about the design process for the Red Surrender. I was really impressed by how simple and straightforward the updated rules are. Kinda like how the Pareidolia Condition strips down Malkavia to its most interesting essentials in False Gods [at least imo].


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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by SomethingFishy View Post
                                I like it, too. It is really different from most of what I've contributed so far! And while on the subject of art I contributed to this book, I was very happy you were on board with giving the Redwater Bay ghoul the iconic "BITCH" shirt from Bloodlines. I love that stupid shirt, and it brought me immense joy sneaking it into the book!
                                I loved the reference, and as I'm sure everyone must know by know, I love a good VTMB Easter Egg; I think we're 4 for 5, because I can't remember managing to fit one into Better Feared (though I guess the Von Schrecks could be read as an extremely orthogonal reference to Gary Golden). The Strange Shades one is very subtle, but the Sin Again and False Gods ones are pretty overt

                                Originally posted by SomethingFishy View Post
                                And I'm interested to hear about the design process for the Red Surrender. I was really impressed by how simple and straightforward the updated rules are. Kinda like how the Pareidolia Condition strips down Malkavia to its most interesting essentials in False Gods [at least imo].
                                Funny enough, for how efficient that Merit ended up, Red Surrender went through a lot of conceptual retooling over the course of writing. I'll talk about it in detail tomorrow, but it was initially a much more robust system, and early on, it was going to sort of be a stepping stone to gaining a Risen Beast.
                                Last edited by Yossarian; 05-17-2022, 05:29 PM.



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