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  • Oathbreakers

    What happens on a rules level when a werewolf break a tribal oath (2nd ed) ?
    Not only Forsaken, but also the Pure.
    Can't find the rules on the book.

    Some tribal oath are tricky, like the predator kings one.


    -'' When the winds howl and the Storms rage, where will you run?''-

  • #2
    I would say it like violating the Oaths of the Moon,
    a breaking point towards flesh modified by -2.

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    • #3
      They're mentioned in the Harmony section, they offer a penalty to certain Harmony breaking rolls. Oaths are mostly a non-mechanical thing, however and have non-mechanical ramifications.

      Bans are different.

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      • #4
        I would also rule for ST ramifications as with any violation of the Oaths of the Moon. Words gets around if you do something big or something small enough times and that can negatively impact a characters relationship with other members of the tribe or with Uratha in general.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Heroofthemists View Post
          I would also rule for ST ramifications as with any violation of the Oaths of the Moon. Words gets around if you do something big or something small enough times and that can negatively impact a characters relationship with other members of the tribe or with Uratha in general.
          Yes that's the non-mechanical ramifications I was talking about. It goes into this on p72, presumably where Helur brought the question up from.

          Thing is the severity of the ramification is going to depend on the setting. Some packs may have a more blase attitude towards some things, and lodges can direct focus away from the tribe, or closely to it, such as with the tribal pillar lodges.

          An obvious and more extreme result is to have a devout member of said tribe to come and judge the character, potentially targeting them in a Sacred Hunt.
          Last edited by nofather; 03-08-2017, 10:34 PM.

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          • #6
            What nofather said, and the Blood Talons would love to call the Hunt on such werewolves.

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            • #7
              Yea, I was talking more about the tribal bans.
              The Predator Kings for example are the most prone to create internal tribal feuds and hunts. In the first edition book a lot of predator kings goes urban, and I think it will not change on the 2nd ed.
              What do you think about it?

              In the first edition Pure book there are a lot of predator kings breaking the oath (Ignition pack for example).


              -'' When the winds howl and the Storms rage, where will you run?''-

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              • #8
                The tribal bans don't offer any special mechanics. And the Pure were always about a certain form of forgiveness. Basically if you suffered you could be forgiven, which is how their recruiting worked but also worked for Oathbreakers. There's a list of punishments they would apply somewhere in the Pure book. It's entirely possible the Ignition pack make, or at least fix up their own bikes to the point they consider them not made 'by man.' But more likely they just take the Harmony hit, as maintaining a solid Harmony is not going to be as important to a Predator King as it would be a Forsaken who's trying to balance their werewolf life with what was once their human one.

                EDIT: This seems like the type of thing people jump on so to expand on the Pure and forgiveness, 'sorry is not enough,' forgiveness is found through fire and agony, but it's still an option and how they justify bringing Forsaken into the fold.

                If you want you can attribute the totem ban side effect to it. 'a pack member who disregards the totem's ban once will suffer it as a Ban Condition.' With the Ban Condition being more of a supernatural compulsion to obey the ban, including penalties to rolls related to breaking it.
                Last edited by nofather; 03-09-2017, 12:52 PM.

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                • #9
                  As explained already, the system's repercussion for violating your tribal oath are plain enough to see with Breaking Point mechanics. The in-character repercussions are political, in the same vein to an electorate reaction to a politician who's caught lying: Their popularity will drop. Spirits resent Uratha because they lack organic bans, they have freedom of choice. This is why Totems impose bans, this is why Firstborns impose tribal oaths, this is why Luna demands the Forsaken to swear the rest of the Oath. A totem is a spiritual parent, ergo bans relate to the spirit in question, denoting that spiritual connection.

                  The implication of breaking any other Tenet of the Oath can have mitigating circumstances. Breaking your Tribal Oath doesn't. You are always inadequate if you break that (Killing the People while on Kuruth; Disrespecting a high ranked spirit while it disguised it's rank; etc). Displaying weakness, not giving your everything in a fight, or disregarding your territory have no mitigating circumstances because, on top of everything, you choose to be beholding by that specific covenant.

                  And your peers, superiors and prey will remember that.

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