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Where went Klaives in 2E?

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  • #16
    I always assumed it was a variation of "cleave(r)".

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
      If you look back at 1e, there was apparently supposed to be a difference between normal fetish weapons and Klaives. The distinction never made sense in Forsaken, however, because there was no practical difference. Some fetish weapons were just called Klaives for no apparent reason and we were supposed to accept that they were more special and important than the other fetish weapons that didn't get called Klaives. This, like the old names for Spirit Ranks, was a holdover from Apocalypse (where there actually was a difference between Klaives and non-Klaive fetish weapons) that really didn't make sense in Forsaken. So, the term was discarded in 2e. You can still make fetish weapons, they just don't get a special name.
      Bane Blades are totally still a thing in Forsaken, tho.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Malus View Post

        Bane Blades are totally still a thing in Forsaken, tho.
        Yeah, they were mentioned once in Blasphemies, weren't they?

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        • #19
          Those are Bale Blades.

          Are Bane Blades a thing in Apocalypse? Google suggests its a 40k thing.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by nofather View Post
            Those are Bale Blades.

            Are Bane Blades a thing in Apocalypse? Google suggests its a 40k thing.
            Oops. My bad.

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            • #21
              Klaive is Welsh. It's spelled Chledd, but that's pronounced exactly like "Klaive". It means "sword".

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              • #22
                Welsh is odd.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Malus View Post
                  Welsh is odd.
                  Not too bad. The guy who latinised their written language was extremely odd though.

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                  • #24
                    On klaves / fetish weapons in general:

                    One thing I've noticed in 2e Werewolf, as a whole, is that there is a LOT of focus on bringing things back to using a werewolf's natural weapons rather than actual weapons. There is a lot of support for using claws, teeth, and the sheer strength and weight of the different forms. I imagine the lack of fetish weapons being mentioned beyond a single sentence in the core is a direct result of that refocusing as well. Magic weapons seem to be far less of a thing in 2e as a whole.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by MCN View Post
                      Magic weapons seem to be far less of a thing in 2e as a whole.
                      They said they just wanted to kick off the core with an emphasis on the natural weapons. Fetish weapons and other alternative weapons are a thing, such as in the Lodge of the Rat, but they didn't get expanded upon much in the core so people wouldn't come into the game like they were playing barbarians with any weapon proficiency.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Elfive View Post
                        Klaive is Welsh. It's spelled Chledd, but that's pronounced exactly like "Klaive". It means "sword".
                        I'm only a novice at Welsh, but is it not Klayth, i.e. the dd is the same sound as at the beginning of the English "then"?

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                        • #27
                          Ok, yeah, but that's a really, really subtle difference.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Elfive View Post
                            Ok, yeah, but that's a really, really subtle difference.
                            Really, to me it's like the difference between m and d, i.e. two different letters with two different points and manners of articulation. They might not seem as different in American English though?

                            Also is the "ai" to indicate a sound rhyming with "I", the pronoun, or the "ay" in English "say"?

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                            • #29
                              I'm not American, I'm British. But I'm from Yorkshire so my accent might be a little weird.

                              And I think the "ai" is supposed to be pronounced "ay", because in Exalted "Daiklave" omits the I. Possibly because there's an "ai" pronounced the other way sitting at the front there.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Elfive View Post
                                I'm not American, I'm British. But I'm from Yorkshire so my accent might be a little weird.

                                And I think the "ai" is supposed to be pronounced "ay", because in Exalted "Daiklave" omits the I. Possibly because there's an "ai" pronounced the other way sitting at the front there.
                                Sorry for getting the country wrong. Actually looking online there are British accents where (voiced) th and v are used interchangeably at the end of words (and in some cases the start), so it might indeed be a subtle/pointless distinction for your dialect.

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