Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Snipers, but not really?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Snipers, but not really?

    I'm working my way through learning the weapon tag system, and as my first project, I attempted to build a sniper rifle.
    Assuming I understand the system correctly, it would look like this:

    Ballistic Ranged (long)
    Brutal, Two-handed,Piercing, Quality 3

    Resulting in a weapon that gives a total of 4 enhancement, negates 1 point of armor and allows purchase of the critical stunt for 3 successes, and has a wealth cost of 7!!!
    But assuming my understanding of the combat rules are correct, and the sniper and target are of the same scale, The maximum amount of damage that can be done, (inflict damage, critical) is 2?

    Furthermore, even with the Style Edge: Sniper (3), there's no way to increase this damage?

    So, it seems that the only way to one-shot a character from fully healthy to taken out is to have an effective scale difference of 2, allowing the purchase of inflict damage 2 more times. Is this right? Is it working as intended?

    I get that it's not fun to be taken out of a scene in one action, but it seems like "bullet to the head" should be fatal from a mechanical perspective, not just "the SG says, in this case, you're down"

  • #2
    Storypath is a drama-focussed system. You’ll one shot any character unimportant to the plot (minor characters), but you won’t insta-kill anyone important to the plot (antagonists). This works both ways - they can’t insta-snipe your character either.


    Writes stuff. Sometimes you like it.
    WoD | Changing Breeds, Umbra, Book of the Wyrm, Shattered Dreams | CofD | Werewolf: The Forsaken 2nd ed, Idigam Anthology, The Pack, Demon Storyteller's Guide, Hurt Locker, Dark Eras Companion, Beast Player's Guide, Deviant: The Renegades, Night Horrors: Shunned by the Moon, Mummy: The Curse 2nd ed | The Trinity Continuum Æon, Æon Æxpansion, Aberrant

    Comment


    • #3
      In general, non-minor characters can only ever be "taken out" via the damage systems: knocked unconscious or otherwise incapacitated. Killing someone at that point is an intentional choice on the part of either the player characters or the Storyguide.


      Ian A. A. Watson
      Onyx Path Community Manager

      Comment


      • #4
        I understand what both of you are saying, and we can even go with the Maxwell Mercer standpoint on killing of "There's always a better way"

        But I see some very negative consequences to drama in such a low lethality system.

        Your need to rescue a WW1 defector with information critical to the allies who is bleeding out in the middle of a no-mans land, with a sniper covering him from the church tower, trying to bait the heroes into his crosshairs? Just make a run for it, worst case scenario, you'll get shot in the head and end up with a migraine.

        Have 2 points of hard armor? You're completely immune to the first shot!

        Your license to kill super spy infiltrates the base of a maniacal villain, pulls out his Walther PPK, puts it to the base of his skull, pulls the trigger and the villain says ow?

        This reduced lethality feels like a reduction in consequences, which has the potential to stifle drama.

        Does the villain at the end of the story who has been able to thwart the heroes through chapter after chapter suddenly become a minor character to facilitate the coup de grace that Her Majesty has ordered?

        I know a lot of this falls under "The power of the SG" but it just feels odd to me that the system prevents a 1-shot take out (even if they're just down for the scene) of any non-minor character. But maybe that's just because I do a lot of technical documentation.

        Comment


        • #5
          The skill trick "Shoot to wound" allows you to put a character out of action instead of inflicting an actual injury. Maybe allow all sniper characters to have that power. Or just hand waive it and let the players know that any damage inflicted in this situation is considered lethal. Or, or, arbitrarily make the sniper or super villain a higher tier than the players.

          Comment


          • #6
            I was thinking about this last night, and my suggestion about making the villain or the sniper higher tier in the scene is probably the right way to go and wouldn't even be arbitrary, Tier can shift on a narrative basis, so if narratively the enemy is supposed to have the players over a barrel (or vice versa) it is totally valid to temporarily bump the tier. Running through no mans land when there is a sniper around could be narratively approriate time to bump the enemy's tier up to reflect the stakes of the situation.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Baladain View Post
              I understand what both of you are saying, and we can even go with the Maxwell Mercer standpoint on killing of "There's always a better way"

              But I see some very negative consequences to drama in such a low lethality system.

              Your need to rescue a WW1 defector with information critical to the allies who is bleeding out in the middle of a no-mans land, with a sniper covering him from the church tower, trying to bait the heroes into his crosshairs? Just make a run for it, worst case scenario, you'll get shot in the head and end up with a migraine.

              Have 2 points of hard armor? You're completely immune to the first shot!

              Your license to kill super spy infiltrates the base of a maniacal villain, pulls out his Walther PPK, puts it to the base of his skull, pulls the trigger and the villain says ow?

              This reduced lethality feels like a reduction in consequences, which has the potential to stifle drama.

              Does the villain at the end of the story who has been able to thwart the heroes through chapter after chapter suddenly become a minor character to facilitate the coup de grace that Her Majesty has ordered?

              I know a lot of this falls under "The power of the SG" but it just feels odd to me that the system prevents a 1-shot take out (even if they're just down for the scene) of any non-minor character. But maybe that's just because I do a lot of technical documentation.

              Well, think about how the first situation goes down in an action movie and not a gritty war drama and therein your answer will live.

              As for the quick kill on the boss that you worked so hard to get the drop on, again consider how it plays out in movies, there may be banter, and a struggle, and then the kill. Or, remember, you only have to engage with the rules when it is dramatically appropriate, the tests of actually getting the drop on the villain was all the challenge you needed. It isn't necessarily that the character is trivial story-wise, but that the conflict is trivial.

              I'll admit, this transition is a little less jarring for me, as I dabbled in some FATE games for awhile, and they work on a very similar system, if not even more narrative in nature. There are a lot of good primers on getting in to FATE style games that could probably be of assistance. I'll see if I can dig any up.


              Raksha are my fae-vorite.

              Reincarnation of magnificentmomo.

              Comment


              • #8
                I wouldn't want an important villain in my game to be killed in combat without doing what he's supposed to do. If my players really wanted to murder him a mile away with a weapon that can pierce an engine block, I don't think I'd leave it to a combat scene, I would make it a skill check, after a story where they set everything up for the kill.

                It's important to remember that since it's a narrative game, combat will only be needed to remove/damage things when you feel it's appropriate. For example a cool combat scene ending with an enemy dying while making a speech about moments lost in time.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This kind of reminds me of the NCIS episode where Tony, McGee, and Ziva are captured by terrorists and interrogated. The while thing was a plot to get the bad guy in exactly the right place and the right time to be taken out by Gibbs usimg a sniper rifle.

                  The scene is social for all that there is violence and the sniper is the moment of awesomeness that doesn't need a did roll.

                  Just my thought.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X