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Simplified interplanetary travel times

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  • Simplified interplanetary travel times

    While the space speed chart has information on going from Earth to Luna or Mars, there's no simple way to figure out how long it would take to get to other planets.
    So, I did a bit of math. While the developers used "closest approach" distance for mars, that's not really accurate as it has never happened in human history.

    So, the information below is each planet's average distance from earth (because calculating planetary positions in the Aeon time frame is too much, even for me) and a ratio of that planet's distance in relation to mars. Simply multiply the travel time to marts on the space speed chart by the ratio below to figure out how long it would take to get to other planets.

    Mars Venus Mercury Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune
    0.52 0.28 0.61 4.2 8.52 18.21 29.09
    0.54 1.17 8.08 16.38 35.02 55.94

  • #2
    Originally posted by Baladain View Post
    While the space speed chart has information on going from Earth to Luna or Mars, there's no simple way to figure out how long it would take to get to other planets.
    So, I did a bit of math. While the developers used "closest approach" distance for mars, that's not really accurate as it has never happened in human history.

    So, the information below is each planet's average distance from earth (because calculating planetary positions in the Aeon time frame is too much, even for me) and a ratio of that planet's distance in relation to mars. Simply multiply the travel time to marts on the space speed chart by the ratio below to figure out how long it would take to get to other planets.
    Mars Venus Mercury Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune
    0.52 0.28 0.61 4.2 8.52 18.21 29.09
    0.54 1.17 8.08 16.38 35.02 55.94
    Uh, what? Closest approach to Mars happens every few years. Elliptical orbits ensure that. There isn't a single planet that has an orbital period so long that it hasn't managed closest approach in human history. Even Pluto's orbital period is under 250 years.

    Edit: https://mars.nasa.gov/allaboutmars/n...lose-approach/

    They debunk the myth about a 60,000 year close approach here. It happens every 26 months.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jetstream View Post

      Uh, what? Closest approach to Mars happens every few years. Elliptical orbits ensure that. There isn't a single planet that has an orbital period so long that it hasn't managed closest approach in human history. Even Pluto's orbital period is under 250 years.

      Edit: https://mars.nasa.gov/allaboutmars/n...lose-approach/

      They debunk the myth about a 60,000 year close approach here. It happens every 26 months.

      I think you've misread. Simple quote from your source:
      "All of these factors mean that not all close encounters are equal. In 2003, Mars made its closest approach to Earth in nearly 60,000 years! It won't be that close again until the year 2287."
      What they're debunking is
      "The message is that Mars will look as big as the Moon in our night sky. If that were true, we'd be in big trouble given the gravitational pulls on Earth, Mars, and our Moon!"


      Now, a "Close approach" does happen every 26 months, you're absolutely correct. But "Close" does not equal "Closest"
      For example, in 2003, the distance from Earth to Mars was 56 million KM. But the closest possible approach is 54.6 million KM.

      For more details, please visit https://www.space.com/24701-how-long...t-to-mars.html

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