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What’s your favorite thing about Aberrant? (Positive thread)

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  • What’s your favorite thing about Aberrant? (Positive thread)

    In the last day or so of this Kickstarter, tell everyone what you like about Aberrant. Some cool setting bit, some interesting bit of mechanics, whatever. What is the coolest thing?

    (And please no complaints in this thread)


    ....

  • #2
    So, I never actually got into Aberrant the first time around. I got into Adventure! slightly, but Aberrant didn’t ever really get onto my radar until years later. So this is my first time really reading it.

    And one thing I’m really enjoying is that the setting is exploring what happens when Reed Richards ISN’T Useless. When the setting isn’t locked into this “psudo-modern day” level of tech and can’t change because then it wouldn’t resonate with readers anymore. It’s a world where you can make a difference.

    It’s also a world where you’re not forced to be a superhero. Lots of comics and settings just kind of assume that when you get superpowers, you become a hero or villain (and bad things happen if you don’t). Here, you can be a corporate consultant if you want, openly use your powers, and everything. It’s very cool.


    ....

    Comment


    • #3
      In no particular order my favorites are:

      The idea of technology and society changing. That psuedo-modern day isnt the standard.

      The fact that novas don't have to wear costumes. They can in fact be in business. I would add politics to this as well.

      The idea and concept of the Daedalus League. The thought novas will explore space and maybe build offworld colonies.

      You can be Iron Man!

      And the most fundamental thing that i fell in live with :

      Divis Mal. Who he is. What he does. What he represents.

      Comment


      • #4
        I like that it takes broader geopolitics into account, and gives attention to parts of the world that don't always get focus in RPGs.

        The combination of Maxing Out, Quantum Instability, Flux, Transformations, and Transcendance really make your powers feel alive and growing. It isn't just spending XP or resource management, your powers are almost like a second character in the story.

        I like that it is more linked to the greater Continuum, because each game gives me inspiration for the other.

        Although heaps of dice can be fun, Scale lets me play human and super-human actions side by side without having to use a bucket, or count 25 dice.


        Raksha are my fae-vorite.

        Reincarnation of magnificentmomo.

        Comment


        • #5
          Realistic consequences of power

          Realistic Factionalism rather than arbitrary "clan designations" as seen in other publications

          Reflections of the pros and cons of celebrity culture

          Deeper philosophical questions of the human condition

          ...more as I think of it, assuming others don't beat me to it.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't have to do complicated calculations to buy powers. Some addition and then multiplication is as complicated as it gets.

            Once I figure them out completely, I think I'll love power suites.

            Pretty much all of the Nova-based organizations have good reasons for doing what they do. Terragen isn't all about freaking the norms and avoiding Taint.

            Power stunts. I loved them in FASERIP Marvel, and I always wished they existed in other superhero systems.

            I like that I will actually be accruing quantum flux in play. I never really gained any Taint through actions in Aberrant games, just by reducing XP costs.

            Comment


            • #7
              I love Aberrant because it feels like a somewhat realistic depiction of how society and the world would react if we actually started getting super-powers.

              And how it changes the world. Did you ever notice in comics how Reed Richards is super-smart, builds space-ships and fusion reactors, able to cure almost anything., heck, DO anything (with technology). Cure a dying sun? Sure!
              And yet, the Marvel world is OUR world (just with super-powers). So therefore nothing can really be changed since it would stop being our world and quickly turn into some sort of utopia. Reed Richards DOESN'T solve the energy crisis (although clearly he can). He DOESN'T stop world hunger (although clearly he can). He DOESN'T (and so on).

              And of course the comics medium puts ... odd conventions into play because they are comics. Spidey beats up Doc Ock. What does he do in the next issue? Beat up Doc Ock again? How many time can Spidey beat up the same villain before it gets really stale? So a new villain. Until he gets stale. And so on.
              This makes things weird on a villain/hero level. There is a lot more villains than heroes. But why? Surely super-powered villains can get a decen't-paying job if they have super-powers or an inventing genius? In the real world there is something like 1% law-enforcement, 1% criminals, and 98% 'normal' citizens (sure, differs in som part of the world, and sure, some people would be 'drunk-with-power' if they got super-powers, but still). In the comic-book world 'realistic' (or even plausible) isn't really entertaining.

              And Aberrant is that take. Super-powers but not a comic book world. What would happen in OUR world if people started getting super-powers? It'd change. For better. For worse. Sideways. But I bet it would be really interesting.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have 2 big things I love on Aberrant, first is what everybody says, not a Super-Hero game, but a game of people with super-powers, and those powers change the world.

                Second, the Mega-Meta-Plot, the story starting with Adventure and going all the way to Aeon, how the genre change along the timeline without breaking the system, from a pulp adventure to a super-hero to a sci-fi.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Gammelbraxen View Post
                  I love Aberrant because it feels like a somewhat realistic depiction of how society and the world would react if we actually started getting super-powers.

                  And how it changes the world. Did you ever notice in comics how Reed Richards is super-smart, builds space-ships and fusion reactors, able to cure almost anything., heck, DO anything (with technology). Cure a dying sun? Sure!
                  And yet, the Marvel world is OUR world (just with super-powers). So therefore nothing can really be changed since it would stop being our world and quickly turn into some sort of utopia. Reed Richards DOESN'T solve the energy crisis (although clearly he can). He DOESN'T stop world hunger (although clearly he can). He DOESN'T (and so on).

                  And of course the comics medium puts ... odd conventions into play because they are comics. Spidey beats up Doc Ock. What does he do in the next issue? Beat up Doc Ock again? How many time can Spidey beat up the same villain before it gets really stale? So a new villain. Until he gets stale. And so on.
                  This makes things weird on a villain/hero level. There is a lot more villains than heroes. But why? Surely super-powered villains can get a decen't-paying job if they have super-powers or an inventing genius? In the real world there is something like 1% law-enforcement, 1% criminals, and 98% 'normal' citizens (sure, differs in som part of the world, and sure, some people would be 'drunk-with-power' if they got super-powers, but still). In the comic-book world 'realistic' (or even plausible) isn't really entertaining.

                  And Aberrant is that take. Super-powers but not a comic book world. What would happen in OUR world if people started getting super-powers? It'd change. For better. For worse. Sideways. But I bet it would be really interesting.

                  This, this a million times. Look, I enjoy comics as much as anybody and I can (sort of) understand why in both the marvel and dc universes people with superpowers have NO REAL impact in their wold. The world is supposed to be relatable and if they start changing it then it stops being relatable, but dear god does it annoy me to no end, and if you really think about it it makes superpeople completely inconsequential. Aberrant follows the steps of other roleplaying games like wild talents and the kerberos club in that people with superpowers DO change the world, and best of all it does it in a way that makes sense and fits naturally with how the world would react. There are other reasons, but this is the main one and why I love this game so much.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you for this thread.


                    Ian A. A. Watson
                    Onyx Path Community Manager

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Gammelbraxen View Post
                      This makes things weird on a villain/hero level. There is a lot more villains than heroes. But why? Surely super-powered villains can get a decen't-paying job if they have super-powers or an inventing genius? In the real world there is something like 1% law-enforcement, 1% criminals, and 98% 'normal' citizens (sure, differs in som part of the world, and sure, some people would be 'drunk-with-power' if they got super-powers, but still). In the comic-book world 'realistic' (or even plausible) isn't really entertaining.
                      .
                      This is another thing I love about the game setting, there are no cackling "bwahaha" villains (who aren't taint maddened), these antagonists have a legitimate reason to be such, even if it's nothing more than earning a paycheck it's still relateable.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I also enjoy that Novas continue to be the one thing in Story* games that can easily give the Solar Exalted a run for their money, in terms of implied thematics.

                        Like, this is the first time I've seen a game where the PCs could, in theory, be strong enough to push planets around... and the system doesn't immediately break in two, and it isn't a more hand wavy narrative core. (Yes, Storypath has elements of the 'purer' story-game types, but even if Scale is intentionally left vague, you can still say, pretty definitively, "oh, yeah, your Superman-expy's punch is just enough to overcome the Thanos-expy's toughness".)

                        Yet at the same time, the starting XP and the maxing out to advance rules ensure that you'll have to earn that trip to the fat, cackling power-of-the-gods if you're running a standard game, but is open enough that you could easily have a taste of it at chargen. (It's not too hard to have Q5, Power/Mega-Stat 5, after all.)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yeah. I love Aberrant for two main reasons, many of which have already been stated by other people.

                          I love that is a game about the consequences of normal people gaining unimaginable, tangible, power. That has a profound effect on a person's psychology. The other thing I love about it is the expansive world/meta-plot between the Aberrant and Aeon eras. The last thing is, Aberrant is a modern superhero game that is less trying to emulate comic books/shows and more about the real world. Even though the game pulls from a lot of those influences.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Game mechanics-wise, I really like the system for advancing nova abilities. It forces a balancing act between gaining power and unwanted side effects. The slow bleed-off of flux through either Dormancy or simply not using one's powers both gives a reason for secret identities and slows down the rate at which characters become world-breaking gods. Add to that the requirement to max out ten times before increasing one's Quantum score and you get a gradual power creep, rather than a frantic climb to the top. For that reason, I like the limits placed on things like Power Suites and Mega-stuff. It avoids things like M&M's huge problem of "another experience point, another power in my array". Super-being stories generally don't work that way, and it's nice to have a system that gives very good reasons why that is so.

                            Setting-wise, I'll add my voice to the choir singing the praises of its modern age take on the super-being genre. For me, the best part is the depth of character development that such a rich, complex, and morally ambivalent setting allows.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Firanai View Post


                              This, this a million times. Look, I enjoy comics as much as anybody and I can (sort of) understand why in both the marvel and dc universes people with superpowers have NO REAL impact in their wold. The world is supposed to be relatable and if they start changing it then it stops being relatable, but dear god does it annoy me to no end, and if you really think about it it makes superpeople completely inconsequential. Aberrant follows the steps of other roleplaying games like wild talents and the kerberos club in that people with superpowers DO change the world, and best of all it does it in a way that makes sense and fits naturally with how the world would react. There are other reasons, but this is the main one and why I love this game so much.
                              Yeah. I LOVED the Ultimates line. It made the characters I loved as a kid into something that didn't make you roll your eyes. Cap, for instance, was a paragon of good but he also killed people if need be. They even somewhat justified not letting tech go crazy with the idea that Tony doesn't trust anyone - including his girlfriend - with any Stark weaponry. Frankly, the slow rate of world change seemed to be part of what drove Reed off the deep end. I loved the original Aberrant that I could have a Captain America analogue in fewer than 3 or 4 sessions and a Thor-level guy in 10-12 depending on the ST.

                              I love the new fluff and mechanics let every kind of "inspired" shine differently. I said this elsewhere but it's great that "Luck" doesn't show up as a nova power anymore nor does telepathy. While I usually hate OP characters, I have a very soft space in my heart for Marvel's The Sentry and that the system A) makes it pretty possible to create him; and B) reasonable for Professor X (especially with help from Richards/Stark/Doom/Strange/T'Challa) to defeat him.

                              Looking forward to kicking the tires beyond chargen (which was ridiculously fun on its own). Oh, CONGRATS ON HITTING $125K GUYS!

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