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What’s your favorite thing about Aberrant? (Positive thread)

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  • #16
    Oh another thing that I really like about the new Aberrant, what they did with SK Burno and the whole expansion so that Psiads are present in the modern day. I like Psiads, they are cool, and they aren't alien created which means they are natural and such. So I can't help but think of how nifty it would be if the modern era was Psiad rather than Nova or Psion.

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    • #17
      People have already hit on a lot of what I'd say, but there is one aspect of things that's maybe just me.

      First WW game I played was Vampire 2e. I maxed out generation and always had my eye out for a quick bite that'd get me a little farther up the ladder. As a Nova I don't have to eat anyone and have their psyche crawling around in my soul(or whats left of it). I just keep tossing Q-Bolts and smashing people, doing what I do best, wreaking havoc, and eventually I'll have power like the Ante's can only dream of. Hell, as an Elite I even get paid for this shit! Sweeeeeet!

      Maybe I should just say that the game plays to all types of playstyles and tables? Well, you get the idea.

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      • #18
        For those who have been following some of my Aberrant Kickstarter comments this is going to come as a surprise - I like the Maxing Out rule. The idea of basically reaching into yourself to maximize your capability is brilliant. Related to this I also like the Burning Out, Overcharging, and Power Stunt rules.

        They are for the manifestation of abilities that are not immediately on a character sheet as well as to showcase when a super grabs power and goes all out.

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        • #19
          I love that in this game realistic doesn't mean dark or downbeat. Even though the world in Aberrant isn't always great, it's always wonderous in some way. It's all-new, all-different. People are still people, so there are some bad, some good, some who are a weird gray between the two. The setting manages to also find the balance between making Nova's into an outsider class but not making them immediately hated and feared.You can have a character that wants to do good, and actually can. Sure their attempts won't always work out the way they want, but if they try and if they're smart about it, then they can leave the world a meaningfully better place.

          I also love the rules for Transcendence. I love that it makes leveling up and gaining power into a push and pull of how much power you want, and how much humanity you're willing to lose to get it. You're never forced to gain Transcendence-through bleeding off Flux or just not pursuing power, you always have some degree of choice. Maybe not an easy choice, but a choice nonetheless.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by LordHeru View Post
            Oh another thing that I really like about the new Aberrant, what they did with SK Burno and the whole expansion so that Psiads are present in the modern day. I like Psiads, they are cool, and they aren't alien created which means they are natural and such. So I can't help but think of how nifty it would be if the modern era was Psiad rather than Nova or Psion.
            I recommend Anne McCaffrey's Talents trilogy (wow I wonder where that name came from): To Ride Pegasus, Pegasus in Flight, and Pegasus in Space. It's set in the modern day(ish), in the mega-city of Jerhattan (Jersey City + Manhattan), as people with psionic abilities are discovered. The Jerhattan Parapsychic Centre is the first of many such centres that pops up all over the world to train Talents. Spans multiple decades, from the first discovery of Talented abilities to the foundation of the Talent-led Federated Telepath & Teleport, which can teleport colony ships to far-off stars at a fraction of the regular cost. I believe it's listed among our inspirations in the Trinity Continuum core.


            Ian A. A. Watson
            Onyx Path Community Manager

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            • #21
              - I like that the setting tries to follow the consequences of the eruption of superbeings and superscience. Of course, the world won't just be the same.
              - And while looking for realism, it isn't all that dark and edgy (at least, in the beginning).
              - The system is simple enough that it has no need for reference tables (reference tables were all too common in earlier superhero systems).
              - The setting gives a worldwide view, not only focusing on just one country or city.

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              • #22
                I like that Steve Kenson is involved. I have long enjoyed his work with Mutants & Masterminds, and my initial reaction to their Paragons setting book was "this is what Aberrant should have been." Also, he had a number of interesting ideas for the line before Arthaus decided to do nothing but OGL licensed products, so I'm really curious to see what else he's come up with since then.






                What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                • #23
                  Talking about the system, my 2 favorite things:

                  Scales: GENIOUS! Perfect for Aberrant and Scion, not much use on DR:E, no idea on TCFBTS. But still great!

                  The Simple Rules: It's not about the simplicity but about the flexibility without getting out of the rules. No need for long table lists, even the XP tables are pretty straight forward, both for giving and spending. The way you can do anything with a few simple decisions and rolls. Perfect!

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                  • #24
                    What I like best about Aberrant is that it does for Supers what Mage: the Ascension did for mages and Changeling: tL does for changelings. It connects the trope to a powerful and flexible metaphor that keeps the game coherent no matter what setting or genre you use. Mage was about becoming fully and truly yourself. C: tL was about victims learning to be survivors. Aberrant is about the danger of losing yourself in your idea of who you are rather that seeking out who you are. Taint isn't just loss of Humanity it's becoming so totally the dream that you lose the point of the dream. James Branch Cabel's "journey to mispect moor." Where you become so totally what you want to be, that the purity of what you achieved blocks you from being what you wanted to be. Paradoxical, but a real trap.

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