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Les Fantomes

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  • TheWanderingJewels
    started a topic Les Fantomes

    Les Fantomes

    For aspiring players (and GM's) who want to use the faction and drive people up the wall in a more playful manner might I suggest using the model of The Gentlemen Thief/Lupin III as and example of a Fantome with the right skills?

  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Stuff worth looking into if you want to use L'Fantomes as protagonists, rivals, or antagonists:
    • Robin Hood: The British associates of the group are called The Merry Men for good reason, as he's probably the most famous heroic thief in the English speaking world. Howard Pyle's The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood in 1883 is probably responsible for a lot of the popular conceptions of the character in America. Osprey's Myths & Legends series has a really good Robin Hood book by Neil Smith covering the entire history of the character. And the YouTube channel Overly Sarcastic Productions has a recent video about him. And he's been subject to countless film and TV adaptions. My personal highlights are the 1938 Errol Flynn classic The Adventures of Robin Hood, the 1973 Disney animated version, 1976's Robin and Marian with Sean Connery and Audrey Hepburn as the aging lovers, Mel Brooks's 1993 comedy Robin Hood: Men in Tights, the 1980s British series Robin of Sherwood, and the late 2000s BBC series.
    • Hong Gildong: One could easily describe him as the Korean Robin Hood, but that would be understating what a huge deal he is in Korean popular culture. It's not exactly clear when Hong Gildong Jeon ("The Story of Hong Gildong") or who wrote it. Much like Robin Hood, Gildong's exact story changes with every telling, but the general idea is that he's the second son of government minister blessed with incredible physical, mental, and even magical gifts who eventually becomes the leader of a band of heroic outlaws and after a long career ends up as the just and benevolent king of a land called Yui. BYW, the name of his outlaw band is Hawlbingdang, which translates as "League of Those Who Help the Impoverished", and they are part of my Trinity canon as the South Korean branch/counterpart of L'Fantomes. Besides the classic novel, the character has been the subject of a ton of Korean media, including films, tv shows, and video games (including a North Korean film where he fights Japanese ninjas and a South Korean animated film that reinterprets the story as a sci fi space opera). However, a lot of these are only available in Korean, sadly. The recent tv series Rebel: Thief of the People was streaming on Amazon Prime, but is currently unavailable, much to my great annoyance.
    • AJ Raffles: Another Brit, created by EW Hornung as a tribute to and deliberate inversion of his brother-in-law Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous creation. He was in several books, starting with 1899's The Amateur Cracksman, as well as a number of film adaptations. The 1939 version Raffles is probably easiest for modern viewers and stars David Nivin in the title role. There is also a 1977 TV series if you can find it. Raffles is also a member of the early 19th century version of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (which is odd because the character should be dead by then). Curiously, one of the main models for the character was Hornung's aquaintence George Ives, who was homosexual, and Raffles's relationship with his sidekick Bunny Manders could probably be interpreted this way if you wished.
    • Arsene Lupin: Created by French writer Maurice Leblanc in 1905, the most famous of French gentleman thieves was in over twenty books by his creator, and numerous others afterwards. The first is Arsene Lupin: Gentleman Burglar. There have also been a number of films going back to the silent era, especially in Europe and (after WW2) Japan. There is a 2004 French one that I would like to see as it seems to draw a lot on the more fantastical elements of the original stories. As for Japan, the character is apparently so well known there that in manga artist Monkey Punch created a modern grandson Lupin III in 1967, and he's been in multiple TV series and films. As for the original, he is part of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen's French counterpart, Les Hommes Mysterieux (alongside Robur, Fantomas, Monsieur Zenith, and Nyctalope).
    • Zorro: Created by Johnston McCully in 1919, Zorro ("The Fox") is the masked swashbuckling hero of the poor and downtrodden in late 18th and early 19th century California in what is now LA, and probably one of the most famous pulp heroes of the 20th century. His initial appearance in The Curse of Capistrano was immediately adapted into the 1920 film The Mark of Zorro staring Douglass Fairbanks. McCully went on to write a large number of Zorro stories over the next 40 years. He's been the subject of over 40 films in the US, Mexico, and Europe (and even on from India made in 1975), and a number of TV series and cartoons. Personal highlights include the 1920 silent film and its 1940 remake, the 1950s Zorro television series from Disney, and the 1998 film with Antonio Banderas and Anthony Hopkins. I also have a soft spot for the 1981 Filmation animated series (part of the Saturday morning Tarzan/Lone Ranger/Zorro Adventure Hour, which was almost more pulp adventure awesomeness than my 7 year old self could take). Zorro has also been in a lot of comic books, including a run by Matt Wagner for Dynamite Entertainment that eventually included a team up with the lead character from Django Unchained (co-written by Quinten Tarantino).
    • Black Star and The Crimson Clown: Two of McCully's other creations. Black Star first appeared in 1916 and is a mastermind "gentleman criminal" who won't murder, threaten women, deal in drugs, or break his word. The Crimson Clown first appeared in 1926 as a wealthy young Great War veteran turned modern day Robin Hood. And dresses in a red clown outfit. There are two collections of his stories, The Crimson Clown and The Crimson Clown Again.
    • The Saint: Created by Leslie Charteris in 1928, Simon Templar is a 20th century Robin Hood, a "buccaneer in the suits of Savile Row" who steals from "the ungodly" (corrupt politicians, warmongers, and other disreputable sorts). The character appeared in over 30 books, beginning with Meet the Tiger, as well as radio dramas, films, TV series, and daily newspaper comic strips. I've never had the chance to see any of the early film adaptions, and the 1997 film with Val Kilmer, while interesting, diverges a lot from the character's traditional presentation. I would really love to find copies of the 1947 - 1951 radio dramas, as the character was played by Vincent Price, an actor I have always been a huge fan of. But the most famous incarnation is the classic 1962 - 1969 television series staring Roger Moore (before he went on the play James Bond). It is currently available on HULU if you have that service.
    • Modesty Blaise: Created in 1963 by Peter O'Donnell and Jim Holdaway, Blaise was originally a daily syndicated comic strip which ran in newspapers in Europe, North America, Australia, South Africa, India and Asia. A post-WW2 refugee from parts unknown, she took over a North African criminal gang and turned it into an international syndicate (The Network) before retiring to live in England. It is here that she becomes a freelance agent for the British Secret Service, doing off the books jobs, while also taking up her own cases that appeal to her own values or that deal with unfinished business from the Network. The comics strips, which finally ended in 2001, have been collected in various volumes by various groups over the years. Titan Books collected the entire run in 30 volumes, but a few of them are kind of hard to find now. O'Donnell also wrote thirteen novels, starting with Modesty Blaise. There's a 1966 film adaption, but it's more in the style of the kind of stuff Austin Powers was parodying than the original character. There's also the 2004 film My Name is Modesty, produced by Quinten Tarantino, but it is a prequel to her comic and novel adventures.
    • The Phantom: David Niven's character in the 1963 classic The Pink Panther, an English playboy, Sir Charles Lytton, who is secretly one of the world's greatest jewel thieves.
    • Thomas Crown: The lead character from the 1968 heist film The Thomas Crown Affair (as well as it's pretty good 1999 remake), a multimillionaire businessman-sportsman who also masterminds bank robberies. Just personally, I kind of like the remake better as L'Fantomes inspiration, as it involves art theft instead of banks, and the final heist is a lot of fun.
    Last edited by No One of Consequence; 03-06-2020, 06:53 PM.

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    I'll also recommend both versions of the film The Thomas Crown Affair.

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  • Penelope
    replied
    Thanks. I really appreciate your help. I’m gonna sign off now. Ttyl.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mateus Luz
    replied
    Originally posted by Penelope View Post
    Mateus Luz I love it! Thank you 😊.

    What does this mean in Portuguese? Desconhecida.
    Unknown (in this case for a female or female object, we have gender for objects like in Spanish)

    Leave a comment:


  • Penelope
    replied
    Mateus Luz I love it! Thank you 😊.

    What does this mean in Portuguese? Desconhecida.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mateus Luz
    replied
    Originally posted by Penelope View Post
    Mateus Luz thanks! Can you summarize it for me?
    Not much to say actually. Once Utopia start cleaning the criminal underworld, Les Fantomes lost much of their former contractors, so they lost much of their power. Also, their enemies (mafias from several places) joined forces to be able to stay in business, what put them in an even worse situation, as they used to be enemies.
    So the campaigns for Les Fantomes stoped being about stealing museums and banks, and become more like a spy game, helping Utopia and the police to get the bad guys in a less explosive way.

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  • Penelope
    replied
    @No One of Consequence

    “This guy we killed wasn’t exactly Voltaire, you know...”

    Francis Abernathy in The Secret History, describing how he and his friends accidentally murdered and mutilated a farmer while they were drunk and high and reenacting a Dionysian ritual.

    Sorry. I’m in a good mood today and I couldn’t resist 😊.

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  • Penelope
    replied
    Mateus Luz thanks! Can you summarize it for me?

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    I first remember reading about it in Thomas Madden's Venice: A New History. I think one of Ellis Peters's Brother Cadfael mysteries (The Holy Thief) deals with the subject. The only book I'm aware of specifically on the subject is Patrick Geary's Fulta Sacra: Thefts of Relics in the Central Middle Ages, which is from 30 years ago and is rediculously expensive even in ebook form.

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  • Eldagusto
    replied
    Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
    Incidentally, there is a little discussed aspect of medieval Christian culture, the theft of holy relics. This was not technically immoral, with the idea being that if you succeeded in stealing a relic (say, a Saint's entire corpse) so that your own city's church now had it, then clearly God approved of your undertaking.
    Hey it works in Crusader Kings! Doesn't stop the abbey you looted from resenting you.

    Any suggested reading on the subject? Saint Bones and Srariras always interested me.

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Incidentally, there is a little discussed aspect of medieval Christian culture, the theft of holy relics. This was not technically immoral, with the idea being that if you succeeded in stealing a relic (say, a Saint's entire corpse) so that your own city's church now had it, then clearly God approved of your undertaking.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mateus Luz
    replied
    Originally posted by Penelope View Post
    [USER="12890"]
    @muon I read the Aberrant 2e Kickstarter. There was nothing about them in there, was there?
    Yes there is. Last page of chapter 4, after describing all the nova allegiances they talk a little about the others from Core, among them Les Fantomes. Basically 2 paragraphs.

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  • Penelope
    replied
    No One of Consequence I love it!!! 😊 I’m totally gonna make the dynasty start with Robin and Marian. Remember, Milady wasn’t born an aristocrat. She was a street girl whose beauty and charm captivated the Musketeer Athos, so he married her. She loved him too, but she broke up with him cause she was a free spirit who wanted to live life on her own terms, which is why she’s the founder of Les Fantomes.

    @muon I read the Aberrant 2e Kickstarter. There was nothing about them in there, was there?

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  • Eldagusto
    replied
    I mean you don't have to have him as cutthroat or brutal, but the flair is there!

    It worked in Venture Brothers!

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