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How does Trinity / Storypath Combat feel. What is cool? What would you change?

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  • How does Trinity / Storypath Combat feel. What is cool? What would you change?

    I´ve read already the Rules Question Tread, but as in the topic title: How does it feel?

    How do you as players or gm experience it?
    How does it flow especially when skill tricks and what not are involved?

    What would/did you change to have a better experience?


    Gamelines: Requiem, Lost, Awakening, Trinity Continuum: Aeon, some V5.
    Likes cheesecake (quark-based)

  • #2
    My experience is great.

    It’s dynamic in general and goes pretty fast after a few sessions, when people get used to the stunts. The idea of buying even the cause injury stunt is a bit odd at first, but the flexibility and the options you get are pretty interesting.

    Most of my combat scenes were in Scion, so no skill tricks, but I GMd Trinity, both core and a aberrant, and it worked fine, even with powers. You describe whatever you want and try to get successes, if didn’t work, you cut what you can’t get, or you just say I will attack that guy and with the successes you get you just say what you going to do, both ideas worked fine.

    What you can’t expect is a very technical combat, with things like multiple attacks, dual wielding, tactical movement, etc, it’s an action movie combat, so you can do Wuxia quite easy, but not a detailed MMA fight in the octagon.


    House Rules - The Basics - House Rules for Trinity Continuum
    Fists of Flux - Inspired and Powered Martial Arts for Talents
    Tomes of Inspiration - Rituals and Dark Magic in Fists of Flux

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    • #3
      I like it. The hardest part my players had wrapping their heads around was not determining exactly what their attack was before they rolled it, because the number of successes you get can greatly impact what things you can do.

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      • #4
        I admit that I'm not sure I'm up on the damage system. You can buy inflict damage for 1 sux. You can buy extra damage for 4 more sux. And that's it. So, you could shoot somebody with a slingshot and do a point of damage. Or shoot them with the next size down from the Death Star and do... 2 points. It just seems a little weird.

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        • #5
          Technically, Inflict Damage costs zero (+ soft armor) successes. As for your comparison, the next size down from the Death Star is still going to have scale over a person, which will allow it to inflict more than just 2 damage conditions, assuming it had the successes. Also, don't think of an attack as just a single slingshot shot. You might pepper your opponent with four slingshot stones, which could Bruise them, or cause them to stumble and injure themselves when they land. You could even hit them dead in the eye with one of the four shots and Maim them.

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          • #6
            Death Star has scale, and so can buy inflict injury multiple times. Well, Death Star can do more than that as it is like 7 scales above regular person, but a weapon with the heavy tag gain one scale above usual and so can do up to 3 injuries, for example.

            Edit: To better explain, every scale the attack has above the target allow the attacker to by the Cause injury one aditional time, so, scale 2 allow 2 Cause injury and 1 Critical, scale 3 3 basic and 1 critical, and so on.
            So the Death Star can cause 9 (scale 8 + critical), but as it is overwhelming scale, it can just win...
            Last edited by Mateus Luz; 10-02-2020, 02:14 PM.


            House Rules - The Basics - House Rules for Trinity Continuum
            Fists of Flux - Inspired and Powered Martial Arts for Talents
            Tomes of Inspiration - Rituals and Dark Magic in Fists of Flux

            Comment


            • #7
              As far as thinks I might change?

              Storypath combat oddly makes me want to have a hit-location chart or something. While I love the fact that each injury is a specific narrative thing and not purely abstract "damage," running it with a bunch of PCs that are in a fight tough enough where they all take some hits means a lot of having to decide what got hit even when there's no real narrative reason for a specific body part to be damaged. Something to prompt for, "OK, they got hit in the leg," is plenty because I don't mind picking between some of the different options for damage to a specific body part as much.

              It also means the SG doesn't have to worry about looking like they're picking on a player or railroading things. Having an attack hit a PC's arm is a lot different between a character that fights with a rifle and one that fights with a single handed blade. Coming up with a cool hit to the leg because it made sense in the moment, but then having a fight turn into a chase can feel like you purposefully tossed out a leg injury to help your NPC get away. Knowing that the hit-location die just came up bad for them makes it easier for players to focus on the potential Complication as a Momentum source.

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              • #8
                The player determines the severity of the would and where a wound appears on their character. So, they get to choose how much it affects their character in combat. It also means they get to choose how much momentum they're generating. I've had players take injury conditions they know will come into play just so they can generate momentum. (I also run it where a player generates momentum whenever their injury condition affects a roll rather than when it causes them to fail a roll.)

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                • #9
                  I might have missed it somewhere, but I was pretty sure that the player picks the severity of the Injury Condition, but not the specific one.

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                  • #10
                    It doesn't actually say one way or another. It says they pick the severity but never mentions who chooses the specific condition. Honestly, as a Storyguide, I'd rather push that off on to the players since there are more of them than me. If the SG is deciding, then I can see how it would get onerous to keep coming up with locations and such.

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                    • #11
                      In either case, having a chart to roll against would be a nice optional tool. Not every player is going to have a great idea each time either. It's not a huge deal or anything (and it's not like it's hard to find such charts out there already), it's just something I would add to the combat system to avoid things getting slowed down when coming up with ones based on the narrative isn't coming to anyone.

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                      • #12
                        In my table we usually pick our own injuries, matter of preference too.

                        I more than once picked a injury that would come into play, also picked the arm that was handling my sword and made it fall as I got a complication caused by the same attack, so the sword felt or almost felt, can’t remember.

                        I am using my house rules on my TC game, and they work fine. Instead of multiple injuries, a hit can cause a worse condition. It makes the combat a bit more focused in damage instead of stunts, but it also makes the combat a bit more strategical.


                        House Rules - The Basics - House Rules for Trinity Continuum
                        Fists of Flux - Inspired and Powered Martial Arts for Talents
                        Tomes of Inspiration - Rituals and Dark Magic in Fists of Flux

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          On picking a condition, if you’re players have some issues to create interesting conditions, I suggest Conditioned Responses.
                          It is a great book about conditions, basically it has many conditions and their results as well as some sources for the conditions. It replaces the hit location table with some interesting ideas...

                          https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product...ath=8329_32938


                          House Rules - The Basics - House Rules for Trinity Continuum
                          Fists of Flux - Inspired and Powered Martial Arts for Talents
                          Tomes of Inspiration - Rituals and Dark Magic in Fists of Flux

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks guys!
                            Okay - I will approach it a lot like SW:EOTE. You roll the dice and then you kick in the cinematics what actually transpires.
                            It will also ask the players a lot more what to do with the things that affect them. For players that are uninspired with hit locations - I got my good ol' hit location die. ^__^

                            Another question is: How deadly is it?
                            A character with a combat dice pool of 4 against another with 8... depending on the weapon just havig a surplus of 4 dice can cause some carnage, or am I wrong?





                            Gamelines: Requiem, Lost, Awakening, Trinity Continuum: Aeon, some V5.
                            Likes cheesecake (quark-based)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It is pretty much the opposite of deadly. Characters generally doesn't have a lot of Health boxes, but they can't put out that much damage per turn either (assuming the same Scale, you can only do 2 damage at most per attack). Characters are "Taken Out" rather than killed, with death happening only if ruled appropriate. This means characters that can put out a lot of successes on attacks are going to be putting a lot of them to non-damaging Stunts rather than beating people up faster (though if the PCs outnumber the NPCs that means your heavy hitter(s) can easily make an enemy easier to hit for the rest of the team).

                              It's also really important to avoid looking at dice-pools the same way as you might with the WoD or CofD. A character with 4 dice and +3e going to cause way more carnage (if a bit less reliably) than someone with 8 dice and no Enhancements. High dice-pools stop being important pretty quickly (~6 dice for TN 8 characters), where Enhancements are the real things that matter for overall performance; Scale especially for combat. More dice are better than less dice sure, but you don't want to gun for large dice-pools without finding reliable access to Enhancements.

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