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What can modern superhero comics do for the Continuum?

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  • What can modern superhero comics do for the Continuum?

    We all know about that infamous Aberrant sidebar.

    But actually, considering where superhero comics were at, there was a lot of influence to be drawing upon. In the modern age of comics, there's even more! It's been years since the Authority came out, or JMS re-did Squadron Supreme. So let's talk about what comic books we can use to draw upon for inspiration when it comes to the Trinity Continuum. Bonus points come from somewhat unusual and unexpected comic series outside of the big obvious genre deconstructions like Miracleman (not that they aren't relevant, just that most of us will know them. I'll start!)

    Jonathan Hickman's New Avengers

    I always thought it would be tricky to really try and show what a group of Mega-Intelligence Aberrants might look like when planning and dealing with vast, global and even universal problems. Hickman's New Avengers shows the llluminati as undeniably geniuses, but also caught up in their own arrogance and hubris, superhumans whose very human flaws cause tensions within and without the group. It captures how such a group might operate and approach problems, and how their very attitudes lead to them developing projects of incredible and terrifying consequence even before they are used. I think this is a great example of how a group of Aberrants deciding they know how to run the world the best could fall apart, or at least be imperfect at best, and cause lots of interesting stories and plot hooks. It also is a great example of a serious approach to superhumans and how they affect the world, dealing (or not caring to deal) with global politics, and how unilateral actions can have terrible repercussions. All very Aberrant, to me.

    Kieron Gillen's Uber

    Uber goes back in time, but I think it's also potentially something that can be used for inspiration when it comes to Psions battling against degraded Aberrants. The portrayal and description of superhumans as living weapons, or indeed simply as just weapons, the way that it highlights how in a more realistic world being the hero doesn't mean anything when the villain is simply stronger and tougher than you are. Gillen wrote that Spider-Man can beat Galactus as long as he is the protaganist, in Uber, Spider-Man would be annihilated instantly. It's a more stark and brutal look at the superhuman power curve which is of use when observing how outclassed baselines are by superhumans and Psions by Aberrants. That's not to say that it degrades or de-values baselines (or Psions), rather it shows how superhuman power is of little use when not deployed effectively. The real protaganists of Uber are not superhumans, especially on the Allied side, they are the generals, scientists, spymasters and such who actually know how to make good effect out of those superhuman assets. The Allied research characters feel very much like they could fit in with Aeon in a time of crisis, solving problems without powers, because they have agents with them.

    Please feel free to post more!

  • #2
    I think if we get enough writers who know that the Silver Age has been over for a while, that will be the best improvement.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Wolfgar View Post
      I think if we get enough writers who know that the Silver Age has been over for a while, that will be the best improvement.
      Could you unpack that one a little bit? I'm not sure I get what you mean.


      Revlid wrote:
      Yes, hollowing out your humanity to become an utterly utilitarian asura is the exact suggestion I would expect from you, Aiden.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll try fielding this one;

        Aberrant was written with the assumption that it was departing from what are known as Silver Age comic values. Without going into the dissertation it would turn out to be if I tried, the Silver Age was characterized by its innocent and campy idealization of superheroes. The kind of thing you would see in an 80s cartoon. I think what Wolfgar was alluding to is that if the writers keep that goal in mind, we would avoid entirely the trap that spawned Team Tomorrow (an obvious Justice League rip-off) and remain in the realm of realism that answers the actual question of Aberrant. That question being "what would you do with powers?"

        I could of course be waaay off, feel free to correct me.

        Comment


        • #5
          I am aware of what the Silver Age of comics means, but thank you otherwise for the attempt.

          I honestly do think that, in this age of comic books and comic book-based films, that some people with superpowers forming 'superhero teams' and making a ton of money off their own merchandise like Team Tomorrow do in the first edition is a very realistic response.
          Last edited by Aiden; 06-02-2015, 01:45 AM.


          Revlid wrote:
          Yes, hollowing out your humanity to become an utterly utilitarian asura is the exact suggestion I would expect from you, Aiden.

          Comment


          • #6
            I've never seen the need to get further away from the silver age, the closest the game gets is via allusion (T2M). Although the Teragen could probably do with less assholes to steer the presentation away from simple morality and toward complex philosophy. Just from personal taste. Otherwise, I haven't really had the opportunity to catch up on the more avante-gard super-hero titles of the 2010s, so I'm interested to see what comes up. Uber sounds interesting, I wouldn't have expected Marvel to be doing anything too daring with their Avengers money train either.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Wolfgar View Post
              I think if we get enough writers who know that the Silver Age has been over for a while, that will be the best improvement.
              It is not like the Bronze age or Iron age didn't have issues.

              Pouches from 90's anyone?
              http://www.comicvine.com/forums/gen-...-hated-747266/


              If you want By Night Studios to release new LARP RULES for NWoD,
              like this post.

              [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_62_1418088885567_853[/ATTACH]

              Comment


              • #8
                That reminds me, this is our new signature character for Aberrant.



                Ian A. A. Watson
                Onyx Path Community Manager
                Trinity Continuum Lead Developer

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great, just what Aberrant's setting needed: moar Liefield's Cable. Although, youngblood might be the more apt comparison with how the story never went anywhere after a few tenative steps... I'd call you out for this blatant trolling, but you just posted updates on Sardonyx, so you have goodwill to burn right now.
                  -smile-
                  Will there be new backgrounds/powers for pouches and/or proper anatomy?

                  Actually, Ian is onto something, Aberrant will now have sufficient vantage to lampoon and deconstruct the 90s comic industry in a way that wasn't available when originally published, in the 90s. I wonder how that will influence our developers?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thing is, a lot of comics from the 90s were massively juvenile to look back on, but there was some good stuff, or at least, some stuff which led to really good modern comics.

                    Uncanny X-Force by Rick Remender is about an X-Men wetwork squad operating without the knowledge of their peers, who deal with problems terminally. The older X-Force comics never really used this hook very well, but without those comics, Remender would never have been able to write a fantastic story about good, evil, self-determination and our deepest human nature. And UXFs slick, sci-fi design with hyper-advanced living weapon facilities (the world), time and dimensional travel, and savage, incredible violence which stains the souls of all involves (as Wolverine puts it, given their mission and the team's make up, X-Force is an "Alcoholics Anonymous with mandatory drinking sessions"). Good inspiration for all of the Trinity lines.

                    So much as I think a lot of the 90s comics are funny in retrospect, once again I think Trinity can learn a lot from the modern reconstructions of those comics.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Nowadays there are a ton of comics which they can use as inspiration. Solars examples are very good, here are some of my suggestions.The ultimate line from marvel is an absolutely perfect example of the world reacting to superpowered people in a realistic way (at least the first two volumes, the rest is utter crap), the squadron supreme line from max is also pretty good example of this. Jupiter ascending is a great story about what would happen if a group of superpowered people took over the government. The Authority of course is also a good example of superpowered people thinking they can do better. Many of Warren Ellis comics are highly recommended. I mean there are so many to choose from, it all depends on what kind of tone they are looking for.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I definitely agree re. the Ultimate Universe. Hickman's later run on the Ultimates and the Ultimate Hawkeye mini with the SEAR becoming a mutant-run state, the emergence of The City and so on were very much in the vein of the superhuman geopolitics that I think Aberrant excels at. And Ellis' Supergod is basically my go to comic for looking at how superhuman physiology can give you a very inhuman mindset.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Aiden View Post

                          Could you unpack that one a little bit? I'm not sure I get what you mean.
                          Mostly my problem is with authors who think that they are doing something really awesome and innovative by having serious stories or themes for their super powered characters, and then feel the need to lecture their dumb, plebian audience.

                          Maybe more directly, my problem isn't with Silver Age material, it's with writers who think they are geniuses because their Batman doesn't solve crime with fisticuffs, fruitpies, and a plucky simian companion.


                          It is not like the Bronze age or Iron age didn't have issues.
                          I consider all the ages necessary steps in the art form.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I would also like to submit that the New Universe Marvel did was a pretty great example of how the world would react to people with superpowers and also how those same people can really screw things up.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yeah Ellis' New Universe was really good for that.

                              Was very glad when Hickman used the White Event and such for his own Avengers series.

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