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Trinity Continuum: Anima

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  • #16
    Originally posted by CHILL View Post

    You could always do what I do with anything from earlier timelines that doesn't mesh with your take on Aeon - ignore it. I ignored HUGE amounts of what came out in Aberrant (and later Trinity books) that didn't do it for me. For the players in our group that loved Aberrant, I just made sure they imagined it had never been published (and anything else mentioning Novas) when I ran Trinity games. Worked perfectly.
    Yes, this has been solution to crappy writing since time Immemorial. It is also incredibly bad precedent for actual writers of the books to do. It not only leads imo to shoddy writing, but i feel in case of Trinity it does damage the core appeal of the system, which is the Core timeline+alt timelines, interconnectivity and multiple hard connected settings, which have full crossover potential and were written with that in mind, because they do work out of the same system and without that it does not have that much going for it, especially, because Aberant was the setting chosen as the odd man out.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by zorb42 View Post

      Yes, this has been solution to crappy writing since time Immemorial.
      Woah there fella. I couldn't disagree more in this case. You don't like something, you leave it out. That's kinda the whole thing our hobby has going for it. If something doesn't match your vision is doesn't mean its poor writing, it just means you have a different take on it - good - thats kinda the point. I have very little time to spend creating setting, stories and so on myself, but even I can take the time to simply ignore something (read: novas). It really works, give it a try. My default to anyone asking 'so hey, how about playing one of those nova thingies in 2120 then?' was 'yeah they all blew up, sorry. So, about those Psi Orders you can pick from....'

      And my take is going to be very different from the writers and other GMs and that's OK (some of them even have a bizarre, unfathomable attachment to them nova thingies )

      Last edited by CHILL; 08-05-2015, 03:07 PM. Reason: typos, typos... duh.


      Ad Astra

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      • #18
        Originally posted by CHILL View Post

        And my take is going to be very different from the game writers, and other GMs and that's OK (some of them even have a bizarre, unfathomable attachment to them nova thingies )

        It can work! I tell you, it can work!
        -returns to mad scientist's lab-

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        • #19
          I think we will have to agree to disagree.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by zorb42 View Post
            I think we will have to agree to disagree.
            Fair enough.

            Perhaps wait to take a look at what Anima actually is when there's a bit more out for it other than just Ian's quick announcement. You never know, you may like what you see


            Ad Astra

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            • #21
              If we were writing a series of novels, I agree, I'd probably take a stricter stance on how the timeline behaves. But I'm not; I'm making a game (or a series of games). RPGs are literally tools to enable you to tell your own stories with a group of friends. While I certainly hope people like the setting(s) we provide, I'm just as engaged in providing enough raw material that people can hack up and stitch back together to play however they want. I'm adamant that the Trinity Continuum is the coolest damn thing even if you don't like the exact thing we're giving to you. So yeah, I'm going to play up the "quantum-wibbly" nature of the Continuum as much as I can.

              Craig Oxbrow used to use Adventure! rules to run Star Wars games. That's awesome! CHILL wants to run Aeon without any novas. I'd like to see how that works! If you don't like Anima-as-written, well, I'm sorry because I personally think it's awesome, but I sincerely hope there's at least something in there you find cool enough to add to your own games.


              Ian A. A. Watson
              Onyx Path Community Manager

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              • #22
                I can't think of a single setting or adventure that I've successfully run "as is" -- there's always something that should be ignored or added for my table's maximum enjoyment.

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                • #23
                  Thinking of it now, actually...you don't suppose their will be any conflict with the game Anima: Beyond Fantasy? It's a series of table-top game related things: a card game, tactical miniatures game, and importantly a pen and paper RPG. It's from Spain, and imported to the US market by Fantasy Flight. I really hope you guys have heard of Fantasy Flight at least, because it would be sad otherwise.

                  While I know that there shouldn't be anything legally wrong with the two works sharing a similar title (although poor Aeon got put over with far less), I do wonder if there may be other confusion or conflicts. If it might be a problem I'd rather see it addressed now before we get to used to the name Anima or risk breaking the A-theme.

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                  • #24
                    Our booth at Gen Con is typically right next to the miniature city that is FFG, so yes, it would be quite hard to be unaware of them.

                    As mentioned in my first post in this thread, this is all tentative. There's no guarantee that this setting will actually get made (although there is a good chance). If it does get made, we won't necessarily call it Anima. That's just the current working name.


                    Ian A. A. Watson
                    Onyx Path Community Manager

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by IanWatson View Post
                      Our booth at Gen Con is typically right next to the miniature city that is FFG, so yes, it would be quite hard to be unaware of them.

                      As mentioned in my first post in this thread, this is all tentative. There's no guarantee that this setting will actually get made (although there is a good chance). If it does get made, we won't necessarily call it Anima. That's just the current working name.
                      Just wanted to bring it to your attention. You guys can hardly be expected to be aware of every RPG on the market these days.

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                      • #26
                        I like the concept and am sure that even if I don't use the setting as an era I will find something worth adding to my games. My games rarely feature anything from the main setting having established my own timeline starting approximately ten years after the original timeline.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by IanWatson View Post
                          I teased one of our planned secondary settings at the Trinity Continuum/Scion/Scarred Lands panel at Gen Con. Understand that nothing's set in stone and things can still change.

                          It's called Anima, and it's set in 2084 (the same year as Total Recall and Remember Me). Other inspirations include the modern Abstergo bits of Assassin's Creed, and (to some degree) The Matrix.

                          It's after the end of the Aberrant War, and humanity's still on the road to recovery, about 15 years before the first psions. People seek solace from the horrors of the war by using memory tech, but nothing is as straightforward as it seems on the surface.

                          There's a reason people in Aeon are leery of invasive hardtech.
                          A semi-cyber punk Aeon game could be fun. Some questions:

                          Would the default PC in this case be human? All the old gamelines defaulted to something other than vanilla human.

                          To what degree will Novas/Aberrants and the Aberrant war influence the setting? Is this an opportunity to see the destruction and horror the Nova Age brings, or an opportunity to actually be the mutated freaks, perhaps?

                          Since this setting is chronologically book-ended, do you see this as a game where people could carry their characters into the age of the psions? Are you going to have some kind or hard setting shift in there (like the how the Aberrant ends the Nova Age)?

                          What is the theme and mood of this game?

                          What play experience/angle does it offer that will differentiate it from being, say a Cyberkinetic Nova, or a just plain techie in the world of Trinity?

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                          • #28
                            The inspirations for the game sound a lot less like Cyberpunk 2020/Shadowrun hackers and corporate espionage kind of game, and more of a thing where enhanced technology can mess with your sense of reality, which is a much more common theme in Phillip K. Dick, as well as the Matrix franchise. Less, "I downloaded the data, let's rock n' roll" and more "Is my ten year old daughter - and by extension my feelings for her and memories about her- real, or is she just an extremely elaborate Pepsi ad designed to manipulate my underlying unserved paternal needs?".

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                            • #29
                              I get that, but we can do 'Black Mirror' style techno-thrillers with the 2120s setting. What sets Anima apart? Besides the promise of technological toys that would fit seamlessly into less technologically restrictive Aeon games, and no psions, why would i play Anima instead of Aeon?
                              Don't get me wrong, perhaps this is closer to the hard sci-fi that i want out of a sci-fi rpg, but it seems that these settings could diminish one another in some ways. There were suggestions that some willingly submit themselves to 'Matrix' like hibernation, leaving their bodies behind with some often seedy individuals in Hidden Agendas (i think). It feels like we are pruning back Aeon and planting the clippings as Anima, but that's probably just because nothing so far has persuaded me otherwise. I consider 2084 to be part of the Aeon era, this is humanity rebuilding after an 'inspired' catastrophe, it was the era that catalyzed 'Hope, Unity, Sacrifice' as human values - it's sequentially needed.
                              I'm not mad, but i am pretty confused as to what Anima is supposed to be to the rest of the TC, Aeon in particular. There are a few pretty well regarded Cyberpunk games available already (plus the America Offline material for Aeon 2120). What can i expect Anima to sell itself on, time-travel, the inspired? Well, at least it will be fascinating to see the mental gymnastics performed to fit cosmic elements like those into a Gibson-esque presentation. That would be LoEG level setting work.
                              -smile-

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Nihilist View Post
                                I get that, but we can do 'Black Mirror' style techno-thrillers with the 2120s setting.
                                We don't have enough information about 2120 in the TC to make that statement.

                                Originally posted by Nihilist View Post
                                What sets Anima apart? Besides the promise of technological toys that would fit seamlessly into less technologically restrictive Aeon games, and no psions, why would i play Anima instead of Aeon?
                                Looks like you answered your own question. "More tech + no psionics" may not be attractive enough for you, but it sounds like a good solid alt campaign to me.

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