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Trinity Continuum: Anima

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  • IanWatson
    started a topic Trinity Continuum: Anima

    Trinity Continuum: Anima

    I teased one of our planned secondary settings at the Trinity Continuum/Scion/Scarred Lands panel at Gen Con. Understand that nothing's set in stone and things can still change.

    It's called Anima, and it's set in 2084 (the same year as Total Recall and Remember Me). Other inspirations include the modern Abstergo bits of Assassin's Creed, and (to some degree) The Matrix.

    It's after the end of the Aberrant War, and humanity's still on the road to recovery, about 15 years before the first psions. People seek solace from the horrors of the war by using memory tech, but nothing is as straightforward as it seems on the surface.

    There's a reason people in Aeon are leery of invasive hardtech.
    Last edited by IanWatson; 08-04-2015, 10:17 AM.

  • Dataweaver
    replied
    1) I'd say that it's either illegal or heavily regulated in Nippon.
    2) The thing about letting a genie out of the bottle is that you can't or it back in. Yes, a black market for invasive mental hardtech would be a thing in ├ćon.
    3) My understanding is that this tech was cracked down on precisely because a Dollhouse-style neuropocalypse was narrowly avoided.

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  • glamourweaver
    replied
    Now that we've seen the official timeline (at least "official" as in "the events that precede that Aeon setting"; not "official" as in "the inescapable events that follow Aberrant or any other earlier setting"), and it's referenced how this tech gets outlawed, I do wonder...

    1) Is it illegal in Nippon, or does it fall in the genre of cybertech in-play there that the rest of the world doesn't use?

    2) Are illegal memory tech blackmarkets a thing in the Aeon era?

    3) If this tech's dominance in the Anima era hadn't been cracked down on - what would the odds have been of the world heading into a Dollhouse style Neuropocalypse?

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  • FallenEco
    replied
    Does Anima have anything to with the Possession Crisis mentioned in the Aberrant Cult write up? I know it happened earlier in the timeline (before the Shanghai Accords) but...
    Also is "Doll house" inspiration for the Anima era?
    Last edited by FallenEco; 03-08-2018, 11:07 AM.

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  • Dataweaver
    replied
    So basically this would be a Talents-dominated era with mind-manipulating hardtech run rampant?
    Last edited by Dataweaver; 03-01-2018, 03:52 PM.

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  • Galaxy Master Zhad
    replied
    I found the old Trinity Universe to actually be a very Safe Tech setting, probably in part due to the Aeon Society's meddling. It struck me as a natural cultural reaction to the Aberrant War that humanity and all its foibles would become the social high standard. Afterall many folk who had lived through the Nova era would look back on the superhumans with disgust and pity rather then envy. So the human ideal would shift towards embracing humanity as is rather then going after some warped ideal of perfection.
    Of course you would get outliers, cultures do differ after all, like the Japanese who turned into something frankly startling compared to the rest of the world. Anima seems to play with the idea of an emerging counter culture being born in the after years of the Aberrant War, when people are suffering all across the world and life doesn't seem to really be getting better, escaping into VR or painting the harshness of reality over with AR seems natural then take that further with people who just want to forget the terrible things in the world and your stage is set for stories that would have made Philip K. Dick proud.

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  • Wolfgar
    replied
    ...so yes, five pages in a book that was never published.

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  • Nihilist
    replied
    Originally posted by Wolfgar View Post
    Power armor/mechs was a minor part of the setting-I believe the VARGs are somewhere between the two-but one that didn't get featured all that much except very early on. Cybernetics were mostly not a thing, really. I believe cybernetics are mentioned in passing in regards to Japan/Nippon, but this wasn't ever expanded upon in detail that I recall.
    Excellent analysis, Wolfgar. Cyberpunk is indeed more about the departing from humanity than the becoming a transhuman entity.
    Just a minor correction, the cyberware in Asia Ascendant is about half as extensive as the whole super-science chapter in Adventure! (5pages for cyberware vs 10 for super-science) - while i think i follow your drive that it was semi-unofficial and never really much mentioned before - the cyberware rules form a solid base from which to infer more.

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  • Wolfgar
    replied
    Power armor/mechs was a minor part of the setting-I believe the VARGs are somewhere between the two-but one that didn't get featured all that much except very early on. Cybernetics were mostly not a thing, really. I believe cybernetics are mentioned in passing in regards to Japan/Nippon, but this wasn't ever expanded upon in detail that I recall.

    Cyber-Punk requires a total commitment to the idea of transhumanism.
    Really, cyberpunk is the opposite of transhumanism. The tenants of cyberpunk is that increasing technology leads to a loss of humanity and a disconnect of the natural world. Life becomes cheap and disposable. Machines and technology dominate, and people must become machines in order to survive and compete economically. Rebellion and revolution is necessary to prevent all of humanity from essentially squandering itself. We will be little better than robots, and it'll suck.

    Transhumanism, on the flip side, states that technology is wonderful and freeing, and that we wouldn't become inhuman, but better than human - free from fear, free from prejudice, immortal and possibly truly free. We'll all be robots, and it'll be awesome.

    So, the thing about Anima is whether the game chooses to illustrate the technology in revolves around as something ultimately glorious and freeing, or something destructive and dangerously distracting.

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  • Malikjack
    replied
    I love a good Cyber-punk style setting. As far as RPG's go there are only a handful. In a sense I can see this setting being the stage were Humanity having witness the power of the Novas, knowing they are still out there, they are trying to obtain the powers of the Gods they chased off. The only means at their disposal is artificial, mechanical, and self modification. The biggest issue going forward is not going far enough with it. Cyber-Punk requires a total commitment to the idea of transhumanism. Humanity evolved by and through technology. The means tons of cyber-ware, bio-ware, tech items, matrix style internet manipulation are a must. I think that having a bit more history that fills in the gaps between Aberrant and Aeon will be interesting. We may even get to see some of the first stages of Project Pandora. Or those stages are a reaction to this setting. Either way it sounds interesting.

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  • Baaldam
    replied
    Smart self-aware robots might be a bit much (though one can always tinker with some "ghost in the machine" scenarios of AIs controlling dumbbots to wave some it away), but what about power armors, mechs and cybernetics?

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  • Wolfgar
    replied
    Originally posted by Baaldam View Post
    At the risk of running very, very much away of the sure track into who-knows-what, but would cyberpunk-influenced anime like AD Police, Cyber City Oedo 808, Bubblegum Crisis or Armitage fit into either Aeon or Anima? I'm kind of curious.
    It is really too early to tell, but as a baseline, no. Most of these stories with some exceptions function the role of robots and cyborgs in a major way, and intelligent robots as well as robots in general were largely absent from the original Trinity. There overall role in Anima is currently up-for-grabs, so that is anyone's guess. Personally I don't think so, but we might be surprised.

    The exception would likely be Cyber-City Odeo 808, which would be pretty trivial to do in Aeon. The rest are all essentially sci-fi action crime dramas, and if you want an action crime-drama, that can be done in all of the currently announced settings with a slightly different flavor.

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  • Nihilist
    replied
    The ties of Aeon/Trinity into 90s anime remain viable to this day, I also found the FSA in particular a very easy setting to insert stray cyberpunk influence into - other places, not always so much. After the Matrix was brought up as an influence - i have a hard time ignoring the possibility of the same niches at least to be found in what little we know of Anima, so far.

    Leave a comment:


  • Baaldam
    replied
    At the risk of running very, very much away of the sure track into who-knows-what, but would cyberpunk-influenced anime like AD Police, Cyber City Oedo 808, Bubblegum Crisis or Armitage fit into either Aeon or Anima? I'm kind of curious.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nihilist
    replied
    Originally posted by IanWatson View Post

    Anima is being used in the original edition in this fashion, yes. The terminology we choose to use in the new edition is still in flux.

    Also, it's not as radically different as you might think.
    Yeah, that's how they got me too, the word actually works for all of this and tying it all together under some kind of neotic/psychological identity/soul could be useful mataphysically to the overall cosmos. I have to admit, over-use of this particular word seemed a little strange to me as well - but i've since been mollified. I'm actually very interested in the concept and hope to see the idea make it into some material, if not the setting of 'Anima' itself. Because, this is still quite a way down the line from what i've gathered.


    The Trinity Universe and Trinity Continuum are not identical settings. Do not assume that minor notes and references which existed in the original books will necessarily persist in the new material.
    This is making it hard for me to think about the setting in the depth i did previously. I used to have a grip on it - all two hundred years - but now? Introducing time-functions into an RPG requires a different approach to history - i can sympathise with that - i've known for a long time that the TU (as it was) would need a complete rebuild to support extended hijinx in time. But, as i think about it, i wonder to approach the whole. Mercer's Aeon was a contiguous (if bizarrely characterized in either aberrant or aeon/adventure, depending on your viewpoint) historical maypole from which players and STs could confidently draw from. Switching between groups, there might be causal disruptions and a number of less traceable changes - but within the same group the continuity was always presented as a linear line from past to present to future - but now there may not even be that.
    As a ST first, i'm kind of concerned as to how this is going to work - especially for Aeon/Trinity, which is at the end of two eras worth of fishtailing history, possibly more with OPP's approach. Don't get me wrong, i'm still looking forward to it - but this realization has left me a little hesitant to venture any predictions. History is now fluid - the 'Aeon' part of the setting has been redefined - continuity may not apply in some cases, it's a bit of a headache to think about frankly and i cannot wait to hear some more details on how it will all function together.
    Time travel is baroque, complicated and unintuitive with too many possibilities to neatly organize into possibilities - which is what makes it such a compelling story element. On the most fundamental level, it's playing with fire in a causal storytelling approach.
    -pyromaniacal grin-

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