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Space Travel in the Aeon Era

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  • Space Travel in the Aeon Era

    How much time will it take a spaceship to travel from Earth to Mars? I mean both a hybrid and a pure space spacecraft.

  • #2
    Depends largely on how far apart they are in their orbits, which ranges between 55 million km at the closest to more than 400 million km at the furthest, which is eight times the minimal distance.

    Additionally, trajectories tend to be parabolic, so it's not a straight line between the two.

    IIRC using our current technology, in a best case scenario it'd take about five-six months to get to Mars from Earth.


    Ian A. A. Watson
    Onyx Path Community Manager
    Trinity Continuum Lead Developer

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    • #3
      Thanks, Ian.

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      • #4
        Well here is something if you want to get all realistic http://nathangeffen.webfactional.com...pacetravel.php

        I just use a program called Celestia (its open source) to find out the position and distances between the planets then feed that into the calculator along with the neccessary specs of the vessel in question. I've used various other RP game material to help provide me with some of the stats that you won't find in trinity itself. Though I can tell you that the FAST ships in Trinity, like the VS 4-5 ships can traverse the inner solar system, from one side of the asteroid belt to the other, in little less two weeks. Biggest limit to speed in Trinity's setting I'd say is how much fuel you are willing to burn for your trip.


        Man's unfailing capacity to believe what he prefers to be true rather than what the evidence shows to be likely and possible has always astounded me. We long for a caring Universe which will save us from our childish mistakes, and in the face of mountains of evidence to the contrary we will pin all our hopes on the slimmest of doubts. God has not been proven not to exist, therefore he must exist. --Academician Prokhor Zakharov

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        • #5
          Thanks for sharing that online calculator, which is very cool.

          In real life, 99% of the mass of a space ship is fuel. Because of the prominence of psionics in Trinity, I knew that the game was not suppose to be realistic. Parapsychology is a science fiction version of magic. There are speculations on a future invention that science fiction writers call torchships which can travel much faster than today's chemical rockets. Those has a nuclear reactor that heat up a fuel at such high speeds that a Mars flight from 6 months to 39 days like the one proposed by Franklin Chang-Diaz, the VASIMIR rocket. The insect like spaceships look cool, but will probably never be built because they are more like magic than real future technology. And that is okay for this game.

          There was a very realistic space combat game named Delta V that I wanted to play. None of my friends wanted to play it with me because they felt afraid of the Newtonian physics involved in calculating the trajectories of the rockets. Perhaps a hard science fiction role playing game could become popular in the future, but most people want space ships that go whoosh! Of course, in space, no one can hear you scream, or that whoosh.

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          • #6
            I'm lucky i suppose that my players were always interested in doing the science part right - at least from my perspective as a fan of Hard Sci-Fi (they may have imparted this desire to get the science right on me, to be honest). Hyperfusion IS a magical form of energy already (of course it explains it better than that with Birlesme and some hand-wavey allusions to manufacture), but fuel is still something that far too many fictional vessels eschew for space-opera lines. The mathematician (and aspiring astronomer) at the table and i agreed to ignore the fuel requirements, due to Birlesme's hyper-fusion - which is placed firmly behind glass for technical analysis. Off the top of my head i remember it using deuterium on long burns and not requiring much of the reaction mass compared to the reaction mass used in previous centuries - but it IS still aberrant-magic.
            Excellent resource there Zhad, thanks for posting it. I have a simplified equation i use for fast and loose travel, but this seems both faster and much more precise to boot.
            I do feel for you Dr. Zero, despite my own proclivities, i've had a hard time interesting some groups to try Transhuman Space - the idea of scientific reality extended out into the future just doesn't appeal to some - as confusing as that is for me personally to understand. I'm more than happy with telling stories in any setting, no matter how real or magical - but the painfully hard-tech 1960s moon walk is far more romantic to me than space-opera hyper-space. One overcomes great technical adversity, the other is ignoring all of that to get on with something bigger - it's a matter of taste.
            Hooking a VASIMIR propulsion device up to the magic hyper-fusion box may still only be able to generate a certain amount of safety ablated heat in the 2120's - so while maybe not a 39 day trip to mars (what g-level does the acceleration and deceleration reach in that model i wonder), i can see the design making the rounds in that era. Although the effiiciency does seem to drop as you increase the yield - so maybe there's a technical roof on what that design can accomplish currently. It certainly seems a better use of the hyper-fusion than traditional reaction propulsion, which i assume are probably some kind of ion drive by 2120.
            Aeon/Trinity also used the solar sail on at least one vessel from the Technology manual (called a windjammer, maybe?), that was a fun design - even though the art seems to have misunderstood the surface space required for anything quite like that to work. No aspersions cast, the art is fine, just a technical observation.

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            • #7
              An interesting thing resulting from the planets' constant movement and the different times they take in their orbits is that, depending on the speeds possible for space travelers, there might be "high seasons" and "low seasons" to travel to certain planets, because waiting some months until Earth is in the same side of the Sun as Mars (or Jupiter or any other planet) might cost a space jockey far less in terms of time and fuel spending.

              Damn, going to Mercury, that makes a whole orbit in about 88 days instead of the 365/366) days of Earth could be a way to get around such "seasonal waiting" times considerably, depending on one's fuel, air & consumable reserves. There's lots to play up and tinker with there.

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              • #8
                Despite advancements in thruster technology, my groups have become accustomed to slingshot-travels. Which is great for setting building, but terrible for pacing and requires a lot of skipped time - enough to lose years in the process of many trips. I have developed tricks to keep things lively, but the first few times we did it i hadn't thought enough about it to make it playable.
                I fully ascribe to long space voyages, in fact, i really wish there had have been longer reliance on slower-than-light generational ark technology. That's a fun little setting to get a campaign out of in my opinion and the speed of light is just another toy in the sci-fi box - not some sort of unavoidable party-pooper.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Nihilist View Post
                  Despite advancements in thruster technology, my groups have become accustomed to slingshot-travels. Which is great for setting building, but terrible for pacing and requires a lot of skipped time - enough to lose years in the process of many trips. I have developed tricks to keep things lively, but the first few times we did it i hadn't thought enough about it to make it playable.
                  I fully ascribe to long space voyages, in fact, i really wish there had have been longer reliance on slower-than-light generational ark technology. That's a fun little setting to get a campaign out of in my opinion and the speed of light is just another toy in the sci-fi box - not some sort of unavoidable party-pooper.
                  Makes thing sort of "age of sail-ish" in that you have long periods of just going to places between the periods of action when you finally get to a new place/world/front. Some day i might tinker with the orbital periods more attentively to get a clearer idea of how far can one take speed scales and keep this kind of set up.

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                  • #10
                    I play with a group of literal rocket scientists, so getting the distance from Earth to Mars at any given moment usually just means swiveling my ST chair to one side.

                    I got my players in our D&D campaign to help me design the orbital mechanics for a campaign setting that was a moon of a gas giant orbiting two suns. Good times.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wolfgar View Post
                      I play with a group of literal rocket scientists, so getting the distance from Earth to Mars at any given moment usually just means swiveling my ST chair to one side.

                      I got my players in our D&D campaign to help me design the orbital mechanics for a campaign setting that was a moon of a gas giant orbiting two suns. Good times.
                      Spelljammer-related?

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                      • #12
                        Could've just been for the funky astronomical calendar. I run a similarly unorthodox system in D&D, but have lacked the rocket-science brains to filter it through... consider me jealous.
                        -smile-
                        But, in my case at least? Yes, some spell-jamming was involved.
                        -guilty nod-
                        Last edited by Nihilist; 10-25-2015, 11:56 PM. Reason: emphasis, jealousy, honesty

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Nihilist View Post
                          Could've just been for the funky astronomical calendar. I run a similarly unorthodox system in D&D, but have lacked the rocket-science brains to filter it through... consider me jealous.
                          -smile-
                          But, in my case at least? Yes, some spell-jamming was involved.
                          -guilty nod-

                          Nothing wrong with a little Spelljammer!


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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by karpomatic View Post


                            Nothing wrong with a little Spelljammer!
                            D&D in space, no shame at all in getting some Spelljammer into it. Some of the stuff in the original box would go to influence my thinking of D&D critters and settings even in scenarios with little to no relation to crystal spheres & etc.

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                            • #15
                              I'm an 'everything is in' type of ST - for better and/or worse...
                              I'd like both of your posts, because: Spelljammer. But i don't want to careen off-topic, although there are some similarities with the Leviathan jump-sequence as i understand...

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