Designing the callings for Pugmire, Monarchies of Mau, and Pirates of Pugmire was an interesting challenge. My goal with the games was to be a nostalgic reinvention of classic fantasy gaming, so some form of “class” was necessary. But I also wanted them to be evocative of this new world I was creating.




Early on, I decided a couple ground rules:




Each calling would key off two attributes. It would have been easy to tie each calling to one primary attribute, but I felt two gave each calling more depth. Since tricks are picked and refined by player choice instead of a built-in progression, it meant that following one of two rough “paths” could lead to different expressions of the same core calling idea.I wanted six in each core rulebook. Not only did this pair well with the six attributes, but six is generally the number of players I have in my games. I wanted each player to have the opportunity to play something cool.



Let’s look at how well I did!





Pugmire was the first book, and at the time possibly the only ...

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