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  • The book says that you're immune to the grandfather paradox and its related complications, which does not imply anything on the level of subverting spatial continuity. Being able to return to the present regardless of what you do as long as you survive the trip does not scan to being able to preserve all of your assets against warping without effort.

    This is blatantly false, as Outis can attest.

    Stable-time-loop-style "you come back in the circumstances you left and get news of successful adjustment when you go and look" is an optimal result that characters...
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  • I'm not saying you stay where you are in the past when the spell ends, I'm saying that if the changes you made to the past would result in you ending up somewhere else by the time the present rolls around again, you return to the present there instead.

    Your example is not teleportation. Your example as characterized through the outcome you expect my reading to result in is you retroactively having never left New York. Nobody in the present is seeing you disappear from LA and reappear in New York.

    If your changes didn't alter the circumstances that caused/allowed you to...
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  • Your A scenario doesn't scan for the simple reason that changing history means nobody who's looking at you in the present is seeing anything out of the ordinary because the circumstances that account for the first outcome are replaced by those for the second once the spell finishes playing out. Your B scenario is why my interpretation has temporal pseudo-suicide generally result in you waking up at the morgue; magic may be magic, but the world likes to reuse assets whenever it can.

    If you travel across the country from A to B during the Duration of Corridors of time, you have rewritten...
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  • I'm not talking about your past self.

    I'm talking about the fact that assuming a physical snapback to your starting present location upon end-of-Duration can result in physically impossible jumps of distance without the Space Arcanum or time-dilation thanks to the fact that you can keep a time-travel spell going until an arbitrary length of time before the present-time "playhead" and be far enough from that starting present location that you couldn't possibly get there in the time remaining.

    i.e. If I go a week into the past, drive across the country, and end...
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  • I really don't care whether we're talking about Corridors of Time or Shifting Sands, because the only things the book expressly has to say on the matter are that the present doesn't move forward from your perspective while you're in the past (i.e. that you can catch up to the present rather than having to wait out the spell's Duration) and that you're insulated from the potential complications of deliberately or accidentally undoing major parts of your life up to and including your birth (i.e. temporal paradoxes are no issue).

    Again, this turns the regular casting of time-travel spells...
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  • Time travel does not imply what is effectively teleportation. Part of the niche/issue of time travel magic is having to account for any changes that occurred between when the end of the spell and the present; you can't go back in time an hour, run to the far side of town, and commit a murder with a perfect alibi. Your present self ends up where your past self would have wound up....
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  • "Respawn in your corpse's place or a suitably symbolic location" is how I'd run it; nobody said faking your death through time-travel had to be easy to manage....
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  • Time travel insulates you from the immediate effects of grandfather-paradox shenanigans — per the book's example, if you somehow go back in time and prevent your own birth, you still exist in the present, but nobody will know who you are. It's not much of a stretch to extend that to events that cause your past self to be killed after the spell's Duration ends....
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  • Curious Neolithic reversal of expectations notwithstanding, Luna's the werewolf progenitor who's associated with being a distant void-dwelling hunk of celestial stone and madness. Wolf's children being the more visceral and worldly of the two is a better fit given the direct relation of the Hunt to human experience.

    It's nothing to do with spirit versus flesh save in the most abstract sense of external and internal strangeness and connected and isolated disturbance....
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  • Satchel
    replied to Understanding Sympathy
    The problem is that you then run into arbitrarily-applied poetics in the name of avoiding getting things that are all different elements of sympathetic magic confused, and also that the emotional impact of a connection is effective, not causative — sympathy is physical/mental/emotional similarity/proximity, which is why Sympathy Yantras work as they do.

    You could refer to spatial sympathies as relations and temporal sympathies as correspondences, but the principle they exploit is still magical sympathy in both cases....
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  • Satchel
    replied to Awakening Spriits
    Archmasters will tell you this is a good thing. They may have a point. :P

    (More seriously, this is also part of the case to be made for spells Withstanding dispellation with their Practice's dot rating rather than their creators' Arcanum rating, as well as one of those things for which Advanced Potency is especially worthwhile.)...
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  • Satchel
    replied to Understanding Sympathy
    You actually don't have to assume that temporal sympathy works the same way as spatial sympathy just because the Attainments use the same phrase, because temporal sympathy is a thing that subjects have with their past selves, not other entities....
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  • Satchel
    replied to Understanding Sympathy
    Per the dev's post from last August:



    ​...
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  • Pretty much. Pieces of a target can generally be taken as good for getting back to the point of separation, as can lost personal effects — if you kicked off a shoe and lost a fingertip running from a rogue chainsaw-devil, the shoe and the fingertip could both be used to return to the scene of the pursuit. Mementoes of significant events likewise serve as markers of a change, whether they're a piece of the rope from an outlaw's hanging or a party hat from a young relative's eighth birthday, and thus can bring you into closer alignment with those spans of time.

    You could even use...
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  • Not in a meaningful sense — again, step outside the confines of the example for a moment: try applying this logic to things that aren't people.

    The main intersection of my hometown has remained the same intersection for as long as I've lived there, but if I were to show it as it is now to myself fifteen years ago, I would barely recognize it, because the pavement, the street signs, the local businesses, the buildings, and intersection across the bridge have all changed so dramatically that I'm actually having trouble remembering what parts of the walk-up looked like back then. Even...
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  • This is covered within the book.

    A Beast whose Horror dwells in a Dark and Flooded Lair with a Chamber based on the space underneath the old bridge on the outskirts of town can enter their Lair from underneath that bridge while it's Dark and/or Flooded, and can likewise do the same with the underside of any other bridge while it's Dark and/or Flooded with a little more difficulty....
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  • Satchel
    replied to A Walk in the Hedge
    "Make rainfall" was called out as within the ability of Calling the Elements and there was a generalized "make any non-extreme weather within spec for the local climate" clause in the Contracts of the Wild, both of which were affinity purchases for Elementals....
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  • That is indeed the standard progression. There's a couple of built-in workarounds, like Sanctums and Banner-Bearers, but both of those have requirements that potentially complicate things, either by needing you to be casting the spell within the Sanctum or needing you to have a sympathetic connection to the Sleepwalker that's stronger than what you'd get by just casting a spell on them.
    Most spells that are actually permanent are only permanent in that the consequences of reshaping/destroying part or all of a subject aren't undone when the spell ends....
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  • Making a spell not count towards your Gnosis limit of controlled spells without causing the effect to degrade over time requires that the caster spend a Willpower dot, which costs experience to repurchase. Until then, that spell counts toward your spell control and effectively reduces the number of spells you can have active at the same time by one until you end the spell, which makes it harder to cast other spells without risking Paradox.

    Reach doesn't have a hard usage limit (though the dangers of Paradox are present), but Mana can only be spent on instant-cast spells as fast as...
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  • If you're in a setting without a lot of other/hostile mages, are prepared to invest Willpower dots in relinquishing spells for the long term or Reach a lot to cast other spells, and don't draw a distinction between "permanent" and "until dispelled," sure.

    The non-mage PCs may find it a little troublesome when being long-term subjects of your spells and/or associates of you as a mage causes them to become affected by your Long-Term Nimbus — a demon has enough on her plate without also turning into a magnet for emotional disturbances, and few vampires would relish...
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Satchel
Satchel
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