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  • Social Maneuvering has zero dice pools included in its text because the system is not based on predefined dice pools (unlike things like combat). The example dice pools earlier in the book are among the most common ones that you would use in Social Maneuvering....
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  • You're right. Since the Success outcome does not mention anything about the number of successes being relevant in any way, they should be contested. Just use an appropriate Attribute+Skill or Attribute+Attribute combo for the contested roll.
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  • Tessie
    replied to Kith & Kin Preview up
    Yeah, "drink" doesn't usually mean anything other than beverages (and water). Medicines and poisons (excluding those that are also beverages, like medicinal tea or alcohol) are also distinctly outside the scope of the Kith's themes.
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  • Tessie
    replied to Rote action as Kith blessing
    Almost uniquely among dice tricks, Rote Action actually does correspond to in-setting information. It's what you get when you do something by the book, either by doing it by rote (knowing what you do by heart, as represented through Professional Training), or having detailed instructions (such as a manual, or a Grimoire for spellcasting in Mage). That's why it's called Rote Action.
    X-Again, on the other hand, are purely generic dice tricks.

    Personally I don:t think Rote Action as a Kith blessing is a good idea. Rote Action represents knowledge, while a Kith blessing is a supernatural...
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  • Tessie
    replied to Kith & Kin Preview up
    While I agree with your conclusion as the most probable intended reading, do consider that "returning" from one realm does not always mean returning to the exact location in that realm; especially not when other potential points of access has been brought up in the power. When you return from the Shadow, for example, you tend to return to the corresponding material location rather than the location from which you entered the Shadow in the first place. What's to say you don't return from mirror space through the mirror you're looking through rather than the one you entered and is not...
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  • I'm guessing you're referring to the Blood Sorcery book? Not exactly. It's a great tool for expanding on blood sorcery, if that's what you're after, but out of the two main problems with blood sorcery in the 2e core book, it only partly alleviates one of them.
    Due to word count we didn't get that many examples so there's a distinct lack of variety on various dot levels. In that regard any book that introduces additional rites helps. Secrets of the Covenants is probably the best second edition book for additional rites despite being mainly a fiction book. The Blood Sorcery book does not contain...
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  • You can totally skip the Hedge navigation rules. Plenty of Changeling players do. Also, introducing the players to a new system that might only be used once (unless the Hedge becomes a repeat location in your game) is generally not a great idea so I don't recommend any homebrew replacement systems either. Just do whatever you'd do if they were navigating mundane wilderness and put a fae-like spin on it.
    What you probably want to focus on is the description of the Hedge, the Thorns, trods, and Hedgeways (p.68-73 & p.198-203). Hopefully that should give you a pretty good feel for the Hedge,...
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  • Spells can interact with Attainments, but not because they are Attainments. If they interact, it's because they interact with the effects of the Attainments. As such a generic counter to Attainments could not work, but a spell which grants a supernatural Armour Piercing quality to a source of damage would definitely work against Mage Armour....
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  • I don't think there can be anything of the sort that would work well at different Humanity levels. There's very little difference in high and low Integrity humans, comparatively speaking. Aside from individual questions, anything that is a breaking point at Integrity 10 will also be a breaking point at Integrity 1. Characters with low Integrity will often shift their personalised questions quite a bit, but there are plenty of things that will remain a breaking point at all times. Humanity is basically the opposite of that: At Humanity 10 there are so many things that are breaking points that it's...
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  • Tessie
    replied to Integrity and modifiers
    What Saibot said. Integrity is largely a measure of mental stability (though not necessarily mental health). A more stable person is less likely to be destabilised by breaking points, while a less stable person is more likely to be destabilised.
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  • Yes? Are you asking why Humanity uses dice pools based on tiers instead of Res+Com? It's actually Integrity and Harmony that breaks the norm. How Humanity works is how all equivalent traits worked in the first edition of most CofD games. In second edition they decided to not follow a single model if they could come up with something that works better for those games. That's why they are different between different games; to work as well as possible for all of them. The devs for VtR 2e simply just thought the old model already worked well enough so no use in changing it dramatically when just adjusting...
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  • Because it's not the same thing. They are different because they measure two different (although somewhat similar) concepts that are supposed to reinforce two different themes for two different games.
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  • I'm pretty sure it's for the number of milestones you wish to pass when travelling on a trod. The further you go, the more difficult it's going to be (provided you're already under pressure from something that makes you roll when on a trod).
    If you're asking if you can also apply that modifier that way, then that could make sense depending on how you interpret the Hedge. A more powerful trod is more static and concrete in a realm that is remarkable for how psychoactive and abstract it often is. That means, wherever you are in the Hedge, a finding a trod means you need to go from a highly...
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    Last edited by Tessie; 11-18-2020, 04:24 PM.

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  • I believe this (or something similar) was the rule in 1e, which lead to it being quite possible to upgrade cheap cars to be better than the most expensive cars you could afford but not modify. At least, this is what my more experienced group has told me. Just a warning for this potential pitfall.


    I think it's just up to the group to decide how much you could reasonably upgrade any given piece of equipment. It'd be nice to have some sort of general cap, but I don't think you could come up with anything that would fit most types of equipment. Like, capping the modifier on a computer...
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  • What I mean when I say the system is too abstract, and what I think other people mean, is that the system by itself provides almost nothing to make the navigation scenes narrative.
    What it provides is for the players to say which type of roll they're going to use. "This part of the Thorns is a misty redwood forest maze with no sunshine. I roll Wits+Survival to light a torch and to keep my bearings when wandering through it." The ST should probably describe how the scenery has changed (preferably to something that won't default to Wits+Survival, but that's what's easiest to come...
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  • ‚ÄčI think what Michael means is that it could be a different type of cipher that's only presented as a numbers station cipher for the sake of lore/flavour.



    I think Dwight's reasoning behind the assumption that it's a numbers station cipher is because that's what's stated in the title of the thread....
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  • Tessie
    replied to Seers & society
    I think the different views can be reconciled as simply differing views within the organisation, or popular views vs doctrine. Seers should still absolutely be considered the Diamond's worst enemies by SL doctrine and hardliners with that view would certainly exist, but the similarities between the two cults could still lead to individuals finding common ground. In fact, there's a subfaction in the SL book that considers it their duty to bring the Iron Pyramid into the Diamond as a fifth member cult.
    The much lesser focus on Oracles in 2e also erodes the idea that SL and Seers are servants...
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  • Tessie
    replied to Frailty Ideas
    What practical difference is there between being compelled to act drunk and being physiologically drunk? In the latter case you could make an argument about interactions with other substances or diseases causing medical complications, but since there's no actual alcohol in the body many such interactions can't take place.
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  • I don't think an XP buy-in to speed up the process through succeeding in fewer rolls (assuming you do succeed) is in any way comparable to having an optional system that resolves combat encounters in single rolls.
    And, honestly, "I don't like this system so I'm going to spend XP on things that minimises my interactions with that system" is the worst reason you could spend XP on something. I don't mind spending XP on solving problems, but the problems should be character problems, not gameplay problems.



    The thing is, I don't think anyone has argued that...
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  • The combat rules have a few key differences:
    • First of all, there's nothing abstract about them. Every roll or modifier comes from something concrete, and it's quite easy to follow the action. The combat rules basically narrate combat scenes automatically as adding modifiers and rolling dice pools literally describe what's happening in the game. Hedge navigation, on the other hand, all too easily devolves into rolling until everyone's done with little to no description of what the characters experience. Even if you make an effort to engage with the system narratively it's an uphill battle to
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Tessie
Tessie
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Last Activity: Today, 01:14 PM
Joined: 05-27-2016
Location: Sweden
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