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  • wyrdhamster
    replied
    I think we got too much off topic - I created the topic for talk on the Tech in various eras...
    Last edited by wyrdhamster; 09-24-2022, 08:56 PM.

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  • Shepherdboi
    replied
    Originally posted by TwoDSix View Post

    You can say what you like, but I have suspicions that when I play Aeon it'll include advanced versions of modern prosthetics because I find them cool, and that's enough reason to have them.
    I said most folks. Player Characters are obviously not most folks; they're unhinged lunatics willing to lop off perfectly good limbs in order to attach lightsaber chainsaws to their wrists.

    Slightly more seriously, the Anima manuscript had some cybernetic options, which were treated as new Edges rather than as equipment or Conditions.

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Originally posted by TwoDSix View Post

    I always thought the FSA was the cyberpunk region. It might not have the tech, but it certainly has the social structures.
    It was. I think Japan was sort of the anime cyberpunk of Akira (sans psychic powers) and Ghost in the Shell, while North America was more William Gibson and Cyberpunk 2020 with Psi powers.

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  • wyrdhamster
    replied
    Soooo... Instead of GLASS from Anima, in Aeon most people are with their hologlasses or smart eye lances, that they can put out in any moment they do not like it? So all have basically personal computer - like with GLASS in Anima - only not implanted in body or brain, but just outside devices?

    Next^x version of Microsoft HoloLens 2?

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  • TwoDSix
    replied
    Originally posted by Shepherdboi View Post
    Given that Aeon's medical tech is fully capable of replacing lost limbs and organs, most folks don't see the need for cybernetic prosthetics that will need a lifetime of maintenance. This is why most hardtech implants are used by government agents or criminals; they're the ones who need extra functionality covertly implanted into their bodies.
    You can say what you like, but I have suspicions that when I play Aeon it'll include advanced versions of modern prosthetics because I find them cool, and that's enough reason to have them.

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  • Shepherdboi
    replied
    Originally posted by TwoDSix View Post
    I'd presume most are either relatively minor boosts or just replacements for missing bits.
    Given that Aeon's medical tech is fully capable of replacing lost limbs and organs, most folks don't see the need for cybernetic prosthetics that will need a lifetime of maintenance. This is why most hardtech implants are used by government agents or criminals; they're the ones who need extra functionality covertly implanted into their bodies.

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  • TwoDSix
    replied
    Originally posted by Mateus Luz View Post
    Aeon was created in the 90s to be the ultimate scifi setting, with all possible scifi genres, and most genres don’t have brain implants, so no implants, except if you are Nihonjin (because Japan was turned into the cyberpunk genre node).
    I always thought the FSA was the cyberpunk region. It might not have the tech, but it certainly has the social structures.

    Also implants in Aeon are, IIRC, really not that strong. The impressive stuff comes from the fact that they're used to disguise Superiors, I'd presume most are either relatively minor boosts or just replacements for missing bits.

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  • Mateus Luz
    replied
    Glass was never super popular. It was a thing in Anima, very local and kind of forced by the government.

    During Nova Era the Novas created many wonders of technology, including brain interface computers, and they were kind of common, until sometime at the start of Aberrant War one or more novas start controling those equipments and so the people using it. Most people that have them were killed or taken by the Novas when they left Earth, mostly because they could be controlled too.

    Then some time after, the FSA government tried to turn themselves in the ultimate tech place, and created what we see in Anima. Most people out of Cascade don’t have Glass, it was given to all citizens there, as a big experiment, that ultimately fail. After that the governments made it illegal to have memory altering computers.

    Aeon was created in the 90s to be the ultimate scifi setting, with all possible scifi genres, and most genres don’t have brain implants, so no implants, except if you are Nihonjin (because Japan was turned into the cyberpunk genre node).

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  • TwoDSix
    replied
    Originally posted by wyrdhamster View Post
    Side topic - in Aeon era people do not have implanted devices, like GLASS chip in Anima? 😲 I assumed that GLASS like tech or universal translators in heads from Star Trek were standard in Aeon.
    ( Still do not have Aeon and Aberrant cores, waiting for 10th Anniversary discounts - basic my settings knowledge from forum posts.)
    I don't have Anima, but implanted devices aren't the norm.in Aeon. Most people carry around what would be a Star Wars holophone, because the continuum allows the games to focus on aesthetics first, consistency second. Aeon is closer to classic space opera than cyberpunk, so it gets minicomps rather than GLASS.

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  • wyrdhamster
    replied
    Originally posted by TwoDSix View Post
    but in Aeon most characters probably have a reliable automatic translation program on their phone (or equivalent).
    Side topic - in Aeon era people do not have implanted devices, like GLASS chip in Anima? 😲 I assumed that GLASS like tech or universal translators in heads from Star Trek were standard in Aeon.
    ( Still do not have Aeon and Aberrant cores, waiting for 10th Anniversary discounts - basic my settings knowledge from forum posts.)
    Last edited by wyrdhamster; 09-24-2022, 02:02 AM.

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  • TwoDSix
    replied
    A big reason Trinity 2e would avoid giving standard rules is because the worth of languages varies from era to era (and group to group). In Aether and Adventure not knowing a language might be a real issue, but in Aeon most characters probably have a reliable automatic translation program on their phone (or equivalent). It's possible, although highly unlikely, that an Aeon game might not have the PCs share a language (more likely they all speak English and/or Mandarin). If you really want your Aeon character to speak sixty three languages I won't stop you in my games.

    Although yes, when all else is equal default to the character's paths to determine what's reasonable.

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  • wyrdhamster
    replied
    Reading articles I think...

    Hyperpolyglots would clearly in TC have Polyglot Edge - and probably high Intelect and Humanities or Culture. Sum of I+H or I+C would be languages you could know as your mother tongue - rest would be so-so 'communicative level' ( like B1 or B2 in English). If you want to make professional Polyglot, beside the titular Edge - get Humanities/Culture Sepcialization in particular language you study-study.
    Last edited by wyrdhamster; 09-21-2022, 07:40 AM.

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    There is also written vs verbal. I can actually recognize and guess the meaning of a number of Spanish and French written words simply because they are derived from the same Latin origins of their English equivalents, but I can't pronounce them properly nor pick them up very easily when my cousin and his Columbian wife speak Spanish to each other. Likewise, I can recognize a handful of Japanese words and phrases by ear from watching so much undubbed anime, but I can't make heads or tails of the Japanese written language(s).


    I also remember when my cousin and his wife moved back to the US ten years ago, I got her a book explaining a number of common if illogical English idioms/phrases and what they meant.

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  • Firanai
    replied
    Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post

    Thanks, this is very insightful. Especially about the distinction between fluency vs proficiency. I consider that the culture skill reflects fluidity, while humanities reflects proficiency. Also, this ties to something that I also wanted to point out and that is knowing a lot of languages doesn't necessarily mean that you're very good at speaking and understanding them, quantity is not the same as quality. How good is your character would depend mostly on their background, then I would make him roll intellect + humanities or culture.
    To be fair, this would only come into play in specific circumstances, for example if a character wants to pass as a citizen from another nation, can you speak the language without any accent whatsoever? Can you copy the subtleties, the quirks, the slang? Ultimately, just use whatever works best for you and don't agonize over it.

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Some random stuff:


    A brief look at some hyperpolyglots.

    Fluency vs Proficiency.

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